Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 48 of 48

Thread: Riding fixed

  1. #41
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by PeteS View Post
    I was actually looking at another bike last night set up with 46/18 and I'm now wondering if that is too low.
    You can pick up fixed sprockets for only a few quid, so you can always change the gearing cheaply. You will need a chain whip to do this, but you've probably got one if you've changed cassettes. One word of warning, however, is to take great care when threading a fixed sprocket - if you get it wrong the aluminium threads on the hub will ripped off by the steel threads of the sprocket and you'll need a new hub

    I think the best thing is to buy the bike that you believe will meet your requirements, at a price that you find acceptable. The gear that you think you need now, might not be the one you find yourself riding in three months time.

    On the subject of gears, I rode 52 x 15 fixed on the road at one stage. It was a very long time ago, and it was, (look away now, Travs,), on the A38 between Lichfield and Derby. I was very young and very stupid then; now I'm just older

  2. #42
    Master PeteS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Live in Brum, run in Worcestershire and Shropshire
    Posts
    2,343
    Thanks for the advice Marco. I have considered changing the gears but obviously having spent a not too insignificant amount on a bike, I'd prefer to get the gearing right if possible. That said, the one bike does offer customized options (unfortunately not gearing) and is my preference so I might just plump for that regardless. As you say, I may end up changing it anyway and will heed the advice regarding the hub.
    I was born in Lichfield and I only hope that stretch of the A38 was not as busy as it is now nor had as many 60mph artics flying along it. You must have had nerves of steel!

    Tonight's journey home was ok. A total of 100m ascent in just over 8k but most of the climb was in a 2k window. The gear ratio felt fine although I did find myself wondering about the finer points of riding fixed - pedalling through corners, stopping before unclipping etc. Plenty of opportunity to perfect my track stand though!
    Pete Shakespeare - U/A

    Going downhill fast

  3. #43
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by PeteS View Post
    I was born in Lichfield and I only hope that stretch of the A38 was not as busy as it is now nor had as many 60mph artics flying along it. You must have had nerves of steel!
    It was a long time ago and it was less busy than today, although still busy. Critically, vehicles were narrower and it was possible for a car to pass me without going into the outer lane.

    My only clear memory from then was riding north past Fradley on Friday the 13th, in quite heavy rain, and looking behind to see I was about to be overtaken by an artic, that was being overtaken by another artic! Those of you who have driven this stretch will know it is a narrow 1960s built dual carriageway. I pulled as far left as I could, got low on the drops, and the lorry's wing mirror went over my head

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteS View Post
    Tonight's journey home was ok. A total of 100m ascent in just over 8k but most of the climb was in a 2k window. The gear ratio felt fine although I did find myself wondering about the finer points of riding fixed - pedalling through corners, stopping before unclipping etc. Plenty of opportunity to perfect my track stand though!
    As far as I can remember, you haven't mentioned if you have any previous experience of riding fixed. It is different, and requires different technique and tactics. There are a few further things to consider.

    My 1980s riding on fixed was all done with toeclips and straps (not always tightened). When I was re-acquainted with it last year I measured the lean angle with toeclips and straps v Shimano SPD-SL pedals. I drew a scale drawing and found I'd ground the pedal at 35 degrees with the old-style pedals and 40 degrees with SPD-SL pedals. I do remember, back in the 1980s, when riding fixed in an urban setting with tight bends, hanging off the inside of the bike, like the MotoGP riders do, to keep the bike more upright.

    I have put 28mm tyres on my fixed bike. I don't particularly like 28mm tyres, as I find them a bit heavy and sluggish, but they do raise the bottom bracket and help to avoid grounding the pedals. Whilst grounding the pedals on corners is something you want to avoid, grounding a pedal on a kerb is far worse. I've only done it once, (on the A38 at Alrewas), and I consider it a miracle I got away with it. I was thrown clear over the 'bars, did a forward somersault and landed flat on my back on the grass verge to the side of the A38. In the dark.

  4. #44
    Master PeteS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Live in Brum, run in Worcestershire and Shropshire
    Posts
    2,343
    Marco, thanks for the advice. I fear it is not doing my mental health much good worrying about such situations...! FYI have ridden a track bike at a couple of velodromes, a few times but would by no means count myself an expert on such matters.

    Anyway, after today's dalliance into the 18T gear ratios and maxing that out before I'd got into my stride, I have decided that 46/16 is the way to go. Bike ordered tonight and hopefully arrives next week.

    Of course I reserve the right to stick an 18T on in a couple of weeks....
    Last edited by PeteS; 29-09-2022 at 11:32 PM.
    Pete Shakespeare - U/A

    Going downhill fast

  5. #45
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by PeteS View Post
    FYI have ridden a track bike at a couple of velodromes, a few times but would by no means count myself an expert on such matters.
    This will make a lot of difference, and as long as you go slow I think you'll be fine on your first rides when you're getting used to it. My personal experience was that it took about three short rides around built up areas to gain the 'muscle memory' required.

    There is one important thing that I ought to mention, however. Whilst a freewheel bike has a natural tendency to understeer on bends, a fixed wheel bike has a tendency to oversteer on bends. I'm not clever enough to explain the full physics of it, but my understanding of it is that when you're not applying power, and 'coasting', your legs are adding a resistance, or drag, to the rear wheel. This is roughly the equivalent to applying the handbrake mid-way through a bend, with similar results. I have never had an 'incident' as a result of this, although I've lost count of the number of times I've had to apply reverse lock whilst cornering.

    ***

    I'm sorry I've had to point out all the possible dangers, it's just it would have been irresponsible for me not to have pointed them out beforehand.

    Personally, I love fixed wheel. It's way better than gears, and I love the silence and the man/woman-machine experience. I also love the freedom from not constantly thinking about gear changes, and when (or if) you should change to the small chainring.

    As for the acceleration, well you'll have to experience that yourself to believe it. If you're the sort of rider that sprints between the traffic lights whilst riding in towns, then this is the bike for you. The hill climbing is very impressive too, once you've got the technique.

    I hope it goes well for you, and you'll keep us informed as to how you get on.

  6. #46
    Master PeteS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Live in Brum, run in Worcestershire and Shropshire
    Posts
    2,343
    So, after a few months of riding, I'm loving the bike and basicallly the simplicity of the ride. For a steel bike and just under 10kg, it feels incredibly light and the handling is excellent. However, the drops are far too low with the kieren style bars so I'm thinking about putting on some bullhorns instead.
    Pete Shakespeare - U/A

    Going downhill fast

  7. #47
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by PeteS View Post
    So, after a few months of riding, I'm loving the bike and basicallly the simplicity of the ride. For a steel bike and just under 10kg, it feels incredibly light and the handling is excellent. However, the drops are far too low with the kieren style bars so I'm thinking about putting on some bullhorns instead.
    Thanks for the update, I was going to ask how it was going.

    Did you stick with the original gearing (46 x 16 I seem to recall), or did you change this? I forgot to ask last year, but I presume you're running 165mm cranks?

  8. #48
    Master PeteS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Live in Brum, run in Worcestershire and Shropshire
    Posts
    2,343
    Yes - quite happy with the 46/16. Of course, with such a light and nimble bike coupled with no chain drag, I need not have feared. I have actually contemplated putting on a bigger gear as most of the (small) hills on my commute are easily ridden in the current gear and I do have a longer flatter option should I need it.
    I think the cranks are 170mm.
    Edit - they are 170
    Last edited by PeteS; 12-02-2023 at 11:26 PM.
    Pete Shakespeare - U/A

    Going downhill fast

Similar Threads

  1. Riding in the Lakes
    By ZootHornRollo in forum Training
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-11-2010, 06:47 PM
  2. Fixed gear Specialized bike
    By Ady In Accy in forum Sales and Wants
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-09-2007, 03:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •