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Thread: Hypothermia

  1. #41
    Master mr brightside's Avatar
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    Re: Hypothermia

    Quote Originally Posted by IanDarkpeak View Post
    Yes a brilliant Idea..
    Your idea aswell?

    What do you call a deer with no eyes?
    Can't climb for toffee...

  2. #42
    Master IainR's Avatar
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    Re: Hypothermia

    Quote Originally Posted by mr brightside View Post
    I had a bad experience on The Calf during the Sedbergh Hills 2009; you're on that ridge for ages, knackered, incoherent and usually wet.

    I overdress for every winter or bad weather race, being hot is better than being cold, i usually wear an LS baselayer, club vest, cag, gloves. If you start to expose parts of your body you'll start to behave like a car radiator and vent heat; the gloves come off first to expose the hands, then the jacket is unzipped but never removed if its raining, if it's not raining the jacket comes off followed by the rolling up of the baselayer sleeves. If it's raining the jacket and baselayer sleeves come up together if needed. The club vest is there to offer more insulation where it's most important. The idea is that i'm never too cold, only too hot, and if i get cold again there's none of this 'making a decision to stop' business because in most cases i'm still wearing most or all of what i set out with, it just has to be adjusted a bit which can be done on the move. Personally i swear by this approach, but most folk won't stand being too hot knowing they can still shed layers.

    It's unfortunate and hazardous that decision making gets progressively worse the colder you get. With my approach all the decisions to put clothes on are already made before i start. Good thread BTW Andy.
    I wouldn't have thought over dressing is a great idea though..

    I thought Stolly attributed some his issues in the fellsman to over heating, sweating and cooling?

    I tend to start quite cold.. but I run hot and will soon be warm. I can't think of many times I've been cold in a race though.

  3. #43
    Master Brotherton Lad's Avatar
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    Re: Hypothermia

    Yep, Goldilocks is the best way, not too hot and not too cold, but just right.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Tahr's Avatar
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    Re: Hypothermia

    A good thread IMO, it has made me think more carefully what I take with me on the hill.

    ATB

    Tahr

  5. #45
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    Re: Hypothermia

    Then think about this.

    there are 2 halves to the equation
    body temperature = heat in - heat out
    lots of talk about reducing the heat out but not so much about maintaining heat in.

    We generate heat by burning calories - so keep them going in.
    you'll avoid hypothermia better if you have, and use a plentiful supply of food.
    Think of your food in 2 lots - 1 lot to keep you going on that long run or race, one lot in case of emergency to help you stay warm if you have to stop.
    Just as important.

  6. #46
    Senior Member RachFR's Avatar
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    Re: Hypothermia

    A cautionary tale about not having enough layers...



    I can attest to be being glad of wearing both a buff and a hood when out on Ilkley Moor a few weeks ago, and consequently I was not eaten by worms :thumbup:
    But in the end, journeys brought joys that outweighed the pain - F.T.

  7. #47

    Re: Hypothermia

    I got a timely reminder in the perils of slowing down at Easter. Set off from Ennerdale thinking I was overdressed (long trousers, long sleeved baselayer, Paramo Velez), given the Met Office were forecasting "light rain". By the time I was up on the Herdus/Great Bourne/Starling Dodd ridge it was quite clear I wasn't, and added a hat. I was happy to be testing new GPS/mapping on phone rather than trying to navigate with map and compass in the wind and cloud. And continuous heavy rain. I think the Met Office were on commission to get more tourists up to the Lakes.

    Anyhow, that was all OK whilst trotting along. But coming down Scale Force I ended up slowing to get a couple of walkers who'd also been caught out down to easy ground. That's when I realised I was soaked to the skin, and the uncontrollable shivering set in in the maybe 30 min I was moving slowly. Warmed up again fairly well once moving faster again, and down in valley by then any, but a sharp reminder that I would not want to be sitting about on the fell in running gear. Waterproof legs have been in the sac since then......

    Re: Iain's point of dropping off the ridge to get out of wind - agree, but bear in mind that in many places that'll also drop you out of mobile phone reception. Which is fine if you're confident you can get back (and irrelevant if you're not carrying a mobile ;-) ), but worth remembering if you're worried you might need help.

  8. #48
    Grandmaster IanDarkpeak's Avatar
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    Re: Hypothermia

    Don't know any details but just seen this on on Grough News. hope he's ok.

    http://www.grough.co.uk/magazine/201...ed-during-race

  9. #49
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    Re: Hypothermia

    Yes, I hope he's OK too. I came across him and an Ambleside runner called Tim who was helping him to put on his overtrousers and together we helped the hypothermic runner to get to the checkpoint on Dow Crag as it was the nearest point we could get help. However, due to the thick clag, the helicopter couldn't get to him so MRT had to go up and carry him down to beneath the cloud from where he was flown to hospital. Don't know any more than that apart from that he was in quite a bad way, stumbling, slurred, at times incoherent speech and loud moans. Poor chap.

    It had started off quite warm, but by the time I was ascending Swirl How the rain seemed to get heavier and the wind got up a bit and I started to get quite cold. In fact, before coming across Graham and Tim, I was just thinking to myself that I'd had enough and wanted to get off the hill because I was getting too cold. Fortunately, once we'd left Graham in the marshals' capable hands, Tim and I were able to run again and soon regained some warmth.

    Just goes to show though - June and it wasn't even as if the weather was that bad - just being out in it for several hours, using up fuel reserves, getting wet and blown on ... it doesn't take much to start to get into trouble.

  10. #50
    Grandmaster IanDarkpeak's Avatar
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    Re: Hypothermia

    Quote Originally Posted by Leaf View Post
    Yes, I hope he's OK too. I came across him and an Ambleside runner called Tim who was helping him to put on his overtrousers and together we helped the hypothermic runner to get to the checkpoint on Dow Crag as it was the nearest point we could get help. However, due to the thick clag, the helicopter couldn't get to him so MRT had to go up and carry him down to beneath the cloud from where he was flown to hospital. Don't know any more than that apart from that he was in quite a bad way, stumbling, slurred, at times incoherent speech and loud moans. Poor chap.

    It had started off quite warm, but by the time I was ascending Swirl How the rain seemed to get heavier and the wind got up a bit and I started to get quite cold. In fact, before coming across Graham and Tim, I was just thinking to myself that I'd had enough and wanted to get off the hill because I was getting too cold. Fortunately, once we'd left Graham in the marshals' capable hands, Tim and I were able to run again and soon regained some warmth.

    Just goes to show though - June and it wasn't even as if the weather was that bad - just being out in it for several hours, using up fuel reserves, getting wet and blown on ... it doesn't take much to start to get into trouble.
    wise words leaf

    He had the classic symptoms called the "umbles" ; mumbles, grumbles, stumble, fumbles.

    My piece on Hypothermia is finished. it will appear soon....

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