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Thread: High Blood Pressure

  1. #21
    Master molehill's Avatar
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    The fact that immortals like Michael Johnson suffer a stroke aged 51 makes you wonder.

  2. #22
    Master Wheeze's Avatar
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    Lifestyle may enhance or moderate hereditary traits but not eradicate them.
    I am Kuno....

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daletownrunner View Post
    Nope, itís hereditary, my lifestyle choices i.e. constant exercise from 11 years old, first cycling and latterly running plus a diet which although probably not as spare as some runners is pretty spare, differ greatly from my mothers life choices and the life choices of her brothers and sisters from whom I have unfortunately inherited my tendency towards high blood pressure, I do agree that there is a tendency in some familyís to be shovelling down half a loaf of white bread at every meal, but in this case that isnít the case.
    Yes, I wasn't meaning you specifically. Some things are genetic without doubt.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonykay View Post
    Clearly both heredity and lifestyle are important. My father, my mother's father and my mother's brother all died of stroke at ages younger than my present age (60); which suggests that I have dreadful genes. But when my GP invited me for a general check-up three years ago (not because of my family history, the practice does it for everyone at certain ages), all my parameters were found to be completely normal.

    None of the above relatives ran or cycled regularly like I do (although apparently my father did some boxing in his youth). My father smoked, and my grandfather wouldn't eat his vegetables (so my mother once told me; he died when she was just 9). Maybe my lifestyle has counteracted my bad genes, or maybe it is simply that I haven't inherited bad habits.
    Interesting. I wonder if there are any case studies on 'bucking the trend'.

  5. #25
    This is an interesting topic - and whilst I've not read every post in detail, I didn't spot any mention of caffeine. If the O.P. drinks tea or coffee, it might be worth experimenting by cutting this out for a few weeks and measuring blood pressure from time to time. You may find this lowers it. (This would be anathema to me; I've always been a big tea drinker - but if I thought it had become a health risk I'd stop.) Incidentally, don't expect giving up caffeine to be easy. Expect headaches and very low moods over the first few days (starting around 24 to 36 hours after stopping). But this difficult phase is soon over.

    The other obvious culprit for raised blood pressure is alcohol of course. (I presume, as a fell runner, you'd not be daft enough to be a smoker!)

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