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Thread: High Blood Pressure

  1. #11
    Senior Member Daletownrunner's Avatar
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    Cheers Wheeze, yes my Grandfather and my Mum suffered with it, plus her sister and brothers, all unfortunately succumbed to issues closely associated with High BP, my Dad also has it although he’s on medication and still going strong at 80 even after a life spent eating red meat and no fruit plus 40 a day up until he was 60
    I think your situation and mine shows that it’s worth a check for all of more ‘senior’ runners the tendency will be for us to crack on as we feel great until something hits us between the eyes, it was only my faint that made me go to the doc, I’d still be happily oblivious without my visit and will take whatever advice the doc gives me at the end of the week.

  2. #12
    Master Wheeze's Avatar
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    Its such a bore! Sitting here with a 24 hour monitor on as I type. Damn thing woke me every hour last night. But at least we'll get some numbers to ensure right dose of meds. Anyway, its not the BP and the meds that put paid to my racing. Its the (also hereditary) coronary artery disease. Message is, look at what illnesses or health issues run in the family and get those things checked out. As I said on my down the pub thread, we cant outrun our genes!
    I am Kuno....

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Wheeze View Post
    Consultant says it is hereditary and diet etc will not really affect it that much so it was pills for me.
    Yeah, I was told the same thing re my high cholesterol. I was also told that it is impossible to reduce cholesterol by more than 10% through diet alone.Turns out most GPs have very little nutrition training at college - I dropped it by 70% in 12 months by cutting out animal products.

    If you have similar medical issues as your parents it may well be that you have the same diet!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dodgy View Post
    Yeah, I was told the same thing re my high cholesterol. I was also told that it is impossible to reduce cholesterol by more than 10% through diet alone.Turns out most GPs have very little nutrition training at college - I dropped it by 70% in 12 months by cutting out animal products.

    If you have similar medical issues as your parents it may well be that you have the same diet!
    That is an impressive reduction without tablets. Did you lose much weight? Most people's cholesterol levels change little with diet as they are unwilling to make the necessary longterm alterations.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T View Post
    That is an impressive reduction without tablets. Did you lose much weight? Most people's cholesterol levels change little with diet as they are unwilling to make the necessary longterm alterations.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T View Post
    That is an impressive reduction without tablets. Did you lose much weight? Most people's cholesterol levels change little with diet as they are unwilling to make the necessary longterm alterations.
    I lost a few pounds initially, as I hadn't understood quite how high calorie/high fat dairy was! It all rebalanced itself once I started eating bigger fully veggie meals to compensate.

    Re the "necessary longterm alterations"; I like this quote:

    ďSome people think a Ďplant-based, whole foods dietí is extreme. Half a million people a year will have their chests opened up and a vein taken from their leg and sewn onto their coronary artery. Some people would call that extremeĒ
    Ė Dr. Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr.

  6. #16
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    Have oats every morning with a banana. Great for high blood pressure!

  7. #17
    Senior Member Daletownrunner's Avatar
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    Visit to the docs done, seems that my high diastolic is probably hereditary, at present the recommendation is more exercise and watch the salt and alcohol consumption, it is likely that I’ll be on statins by the time I’m 55 but a present keep on keeping on. Going on recommendations on here I’m going to have a serous review of my diet as I know that I sometimes make the wrong choices (especially a couple of hours after a run as I have no appetite when I get back then hit the biscuits later) it goes to show that you can crash regular 70 mile weeks in and still need to have a check out every now and again, I now realise that knocking walls down in training isn’t a clear indication that everything is great on the inside

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daletownrunner View Post
    Visit to the docs done, seems that my high diastolic is probably hereditary, at present the recommendation is more exercise and watch the salt and alcohol consumption, it is likely that Iíll be on statins by the time Iím 55 but a present keep on keeping on. Going on recommendations on here Iím going to have a serous review of my diet as I know that I sometimes make the wrong choices (especially a couple of hours after a run as I have no appetite when I get back then hit the biscuits later) it goes to show that you can crash regular 70 mile weeks in and still need to have a check out every now and again, I now realise that knocking walls down in training isnít a clear indication that everything is great on the inside
    I am always a little suspicious of the tag 'hereditary'. Of course, some things are obviously genetically inherited - certain diseases and disease risk etc. However, I have often thought that we may also 'inherit' bad habits and lifestyle choices from our parents.

    For example, somebody may eat a lot of saturated and trans fats in their diet...and get heart disease. They may then pass this habit to their children....who get heart disease. Yet it is the lifestyle that is inherited, not any genetic factors.

    Some doctors may then ask...did your father or mother have heart disease... the patient answers yes and it gets lumped as hereditary.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Daletownrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by calen View Post
    I am always a little suspicious of the tag 'hereditary'. Of course, some things are obviously genetically inherited - certain diseases and disease risk etc. However, I have often thought that we may also 'inherit' bad habits and lifestyle choices from our parents.

    For example, somebody may eat a lot of saturated and trans fats in their diet...and get heart disease. They may then pass this habit to their children....who get heart disease. Yet it is the lifestyle that is inherited, not any genetic factors.

    Some doctors may then ask...did your father or mother have heart disease... the patient answers yes and it gets lumped as hereditary.
    Nope, it’s hereditary, my lifestyle choices i.e. constant exercise from 11 years old, first cycling and latterly running plus a diet which although probably not as spare as some runners is pretty spare, differ greatly from my mothers life choices and the life choices of her brothers and sisters from whom I have unfortunately inherited my tendency towards high blood pressure, I do agree that there is a tendency in some family’s to be shovelling down half a loaf of white bread at every meal, but in this case that isn’t the case.

  10. #20
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    Clearly both heredity and lifestyle are important. My father, my mother's father and my mother's brother all died of stroke at ages younger than my present age (60); which suggests that I have dreadful genes. But when my GP invited me for a general check-up three years ago (not because of my family history, the practice does it for everyone at certain ages), all my parameters were found to be completely normal.

    None of the above relatives ran or cycled regularly like I do (although apparently my father did some boxing in his youth). My father smoked, and my grandfather wouldn't eat his vegetables (so my mother once told me; he died when she was just 9). Maybe my lifestyle has counteracted my bad genes, or maybe it is simply that I haven't inherited bad habits.
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

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