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Thread: Skye

  1. #1
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    Skye

    An excess of annual leave means I've been able to book a week in Skye in mid-Feb. Staying in a cottage in Sconser (just down the road from the ferry terminal to Rasaay, a couple of miles from Silgichan, and about a dozen or so miles south of Portree).

    Obviously running and hills will feature massively. Had hoped i could get a trip over to St Kilda but it appears to be fairly impossible at that time of year. Also, whilst i'm happy being out all day (and more), and will be carrying spikes, i'm certainly no winter-grade mountaineer.

    I've planned a few things out...

    - Trotternish Ridge
    - Silgichan to Loch Coruisk and the coast
    - Some kind of run out from the door, including Glamaig, Marco, possible Blaven.
    - I'd like to venture in the direction of the high Cuillins, but time of year, weather, and my own limitations may restrict me here.
    - At least one trip across to the mainland to do something (if weather permits, maybe Beinn Fhada, or at the very least a long flatter day out around Glen Affric/Glen Sheil area).
    - A trip over to Rasaay on the ferry and a day spent running the moors and beaches, hopefully covering the majority of the island.

    Anyone with experience of this beautiful area, want to tell me of anything glaring which I've missed out? I'm well aware i could spend weeks on Skye and not get everywhere, but the above would seem to be a decent haul for a first visit?
    Last edited by Travs; 13-11-2018 at 02:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Master DrPatrickBarry's Avatar
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    very close to the brige over to Skye. Had a great walk on those hills many years ago.
    https://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/kint...esisters.shtml

  3. #3
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    Thanks... i have got this on my radar, however have initially discounted it due to the time of year. I expect it may well be out of bounds to me due to snow/ice. However in the event of some unseasonably warm conditions it'll certainly be something i'd like to do.

  4. #4
    Master wheezing donkey's Avatar
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    Pity that you are going so early in the year - I don't think the Glenelg to Kylerhea ferry runs much before Easter, it's the connoisseurs mode of transport to Skye - that 'convenient' bridge is a total travesty, the island is no longer an island. The ferry is like something out of a John Wayne movie; only takes 6 cars and it is the only remaining turntable ferry in Europe that is still turned manually. It has to battle across Kyle Rhea at 45 degrees to the rip tide tearing through the sound. Plus the drive from Glen Shiel to Glenelg involves crossing the Mam Rattigan Pass, 'proper' driving.

    If you go out to Raasay, don't go on a Saturday afternoon, there's no ferry back to Skye until Monday breakfast - it's the birthplace of the Wee Frees and their culture still holds sway ...... unless of course you want to catch a glimpse of a slower pace of life, which has a lot to recommend it.
    Whilst on Raasay, you must head N up the 'main' road and travel the last 1.5 miles to Torran, all built single-handedly by Calum McCleod over 10 years during the '60's & '70's
    The highpoint of the island, Dun Caan is signposted from the road at NGR 562406 and is worth a visit - appears almost vertical down to the sea on the E flank

    Ian Roberts, Bowland F.R.
    Last edited by wheezing donkey; 13-11-2018 at 04:17 PM.
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  5. #5
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    I would definitely support WD in saying that it's worth visiting Raasay -- for more than just a few hours.

    There used to be a Youth Hostel on Raasay, and I spent three nights there in 1986. On one day I cycled north to the end of the road, left my bike leaning against a tree, and walked to the north end of the island. The tide was low, so I walked over the wet rocks to Eilean Tigh and up to the top of that islet. When I arrived back to my bike, there was an elderly man standing near, and we spent a while chatting. I remember him telling me about working as a lighthouse-keeper, and much else, but I don't think he said anything about road-building. The previous evening I had heard the Youth Hostel warden talking about the man who built the road, but it wasn't until some time later that I realised that I had been talking to the legendary Calum MacLeod.

    The weather was bright and clear, with the occasional passing shower, all the time I was on Raasay. It had cleared up shortly before I had arrived at the Sconser ferry terminal after a morning of rain and wind. After I left Raasay, it closed in again as soon as I arrived back on Skye. In four days on Skye, the cloud base hardly lifted above about 500 feet; on one day, it was at sea level. On another day, it became impossible to make forward progress on my bike due to the wind. This was in May, which is supposed to have the best weather on Skye.

    I haven't been back to Skye.
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  6. #6
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    Thank you all...

    As my first visit to Skye/Rasaay…. i'll probably only manage a day on Rasaay this time. Too much else to see... Trotternish, Coruisk, Red Cuillin, Glen Shiel/Affric, are "must do's" for me.

    I'd really love to get out to the further flung parts of the coast on the northern and western parts of Skye, but only have so much time, i'll have to accept that i can't fit everything into a single week.

  7. #7
    Master wheezing donkey's Avatar
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    Cool

    As a juxtaposition to Anthony's weather report, my first visit to Skye as a 20 year-old was at Easter 1971. I enjoyed 9 days of glorious sunshine and managed to ascend Sgurr Alasdair in addition to some other tops on the Black Cuillin. I returned home with my nose & cheeks peeling due to sun burn.
    I was a bit of an oddball until I was abducted by aliens; but I'm perfectly OK now!

  8. #8
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    Hi Travs, I live on Skye and organise the Trotternish Ridge race in June. Your plans look good for a week. There will be snow on the Cuillin down to about 400m so I doubt you'll be able to get up into the ridge. A good run that gives a flavour is starting from Slig, take the main path in direction of Sgurr nan Gillean, after about 4k head NW up and over Meall Odhar, descend here to Fionn Coire and pick up path to Glenbrittle. Follow good path down to Glenbrittle and follow circular route up by Fairy pools. You'll end up back in Fionn Coire. Follow good path back down to Slig. It's about 16k with c1000m.
    If you do decide to head North west, there's a good 16k from Orbost to.Idrigill point, a good out and back if/when the weather is awful.
    Let me know if you need any info.
    Raasay is a great p!ace for a day out. Leave the car at Sconser and take in the forest trails heading up to Duncaaan. There are miles of great trails on Raasay.
    Hope you have a good trip.
    Neil

  9. #9
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    Many thanks Neil.

    I'm actually staying in a cottage at Sconser, so Raasay is definitely on the list.

    As for the Trotternish, my plan is to get the bus/lift up to the Flodigarry area, up via the Quirang then run back to Portree, looks around 20-25 miles?

  10. #10
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    Best way for Trotternish is start at Flodigarry, take good path past Loch Langaig then through Quiraing. Follow ridge to the Storr. The final 6 miles of the ridge is horribly boggy. You're better to descend past the Old Man then pick up coastal path over the cliffs from Storr Lochs back to Portree. It's better underfoot and great views to mainland. It's about 22miles with 8000ft. There's a good description of the route on Walkhighlands.

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