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Thread: Hewitts or Nutalls or....

  1. #1
    Senior Member Dave_Mole's Avatar
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    Hewitts or Nutalls or....

    so, decided to do "50 of something" for my significant birthday next year.
    I landed on Nutalls, mostly becasue I have the books.
    BUT Hewitts might be more "pure". The book, however, is currently 81.99 on Amazon!
    I want to stay with "proper" mountains (over 2000ft) and I guess there's a lot of overlap anyway, but does anyone have a preference?
    ....it's all downhill from here.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Quinny's Avatar
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    The lists are very similar but there are obviously more Nuttalls as they don't require as much drop in every direction. For example the lists for the Cheviot Hills are exactly the same.

    There are always going to be some strange results when using formulas though. In the Lake District Helvellyn Lower Man and Nethermost Pike are Nuttalls but not Hewitts. However, High Spying How on Striding Edge is a Hewitt (and therefore Nuttall). I think most people would include the former two peaks as a worthier objective than the latter.

    This web-site might be a useful resource: http://www.hill-bagging.co.uk/index.php

    I would suggest as it's your personal challenge do whatever feels right to you.
    Mike Quinn
    Esk Valley Fell Club

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Mole View Post
    so, decided to do "50 of something" for my significant birthday next year.
    I landed on Nutalls, mostly becasue I have the books.
    BUT Hewitts might be more "pure". The book, however, is currently 81.99 on Amazon!
    I want to stay with "proper" mountains (over 2000ft) and I guess there's a lot of overlap anyway, but does anyone have a preference?
    You could go traditional and use Bridges Tables which is a list of Mountains of England and Wales first published in 1973. It details both separate Mountains and their subsidiary Tops over 2,000 feet of which there is a total of 408.

    I completed them between 1982 and 1985. With modern measuring methods of satellite and GPS there have been a few changes but if you are happy with the old methods this is a great book.

    You could start on your doorstep with the 2 Mountains and 2 Tops in the Radnor Forest!

    The pre ISBN number is SBN 901516 68 6
    Visibility good except in Hill Fog

  4. #4
    Senior Member Dave_Mole's Avatar
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    You could start on your doorstep with the 2 Mountains and 2 Tops in the Radnor Forest!
    Yes! done them....quite a bit!

    But will look that up. The website Quinny poinred out is also a great resource, I srumbled on it after posting....
    ....it's all downhill from here.

  5. #5
    Master molehill's Avatar
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    Golly, I see you are from Kington, I drove through (round) there twice this week. Sorry, no help for your challenge.

  6. #6
    Master wheezing donkey's Avatar
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    How about Alan Dawson's book - 'The Relative Hills of Britain'; all the tops with a vertical separation of 150+ metres, regardless of the overall altitude of the summit - "The Marilyns". Just pick out the 50 that you fancy over 2,000 feet. I now use this list instead of the Munro tables (which are forever being 'tweaked')in Scotland, visiting Marilyns over 3,000 feet .... I now only go up Marilyn Munros.
    I was a bit of an oddball until I was abducted by aliens; but I'm perfectly OK now!

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