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Thread: Practicalities

  1. #1
    Senior Member DangerMouse's Avatar
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    Practicalities

    All being well I am going to run my first race this weekend, I picked Beefy's Nab and have been reassured that it's a great first race. I am looking forward to it

    I am a little unsure on the practicalities though so perhaps you guys can help me out a bit:

    1) getting there and back - I am planning on going by bus - I think this will be fine.

    2) What to do with change of clothes and shoes?

    I am guessing most people leave their gear in their car, but as I am travelling by bus I obviously won't have this convenience. What to do? Turn up in my running gear and not care, I don't really want to run the race carrying my gear, leave my stuff somewhere?

    3) Do I need any of the regulation gear for this race? Map, compass?

    I think that's it, of course I am a 100% newbie at this race business, so I am more than open to any suggestions, tips, etc.

    Thanking ye kindly

  2. #2
    Senior Member Chris K's Avatar
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    Just take everything in a rucsac, then if you need it you've got it and put casual clothes over the top of your running kit on your way there. There will be somewhere to leave your stuff whilst out on the race, just ask, and be prepared to put clean clothes over running kit you can't strip off for the return. You may have a seat all to yourself! Enjoy the race.
    A circular route mostly downhill

  3. #3
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    If you're planning to race more than once, than get into the habit of taking all kit to every race.

    On some more arduous races, full kit is compulsory, and even on the tamest races, the organiser can insist on full kit being carried if they deem that the weather conditions necessitate this...

    Waterproof jacket
    Waterproof bottoms
    Hat
    Gloves
    Map
    Whistle
    Compass
    Emergency food

    Hopefully this doesn't sound too daunting. None of this necessarily needs to be expensive (I've done 80 fell races and still have the same 10 waterproof bottoms, but I wouldn't skimp on a decent top, or indeed gloves).

    If you want to know specifics relating to the race then contact the organiser via their email or facebook page, but I personally wouldn't turn up to a race at any time of the year without all of the above.

    pete

  4. #4
    Admin brett's Avatar
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    Beefy's Nab is a very low key event

    No kit requirements, and a marked course.

    Always bring a waterproof jacket - you never know

    There is a room to leave gear in the pub

  5. #5
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by DangerMouse View Post
    All being well I am going to run my first race this weekend, I picked Beefy's Nab and have been reassured that it's a great first race. I am looking forward to it

    I am a little unsure on the practicalities though so perhaps you guys can help me out a bit:

    1) getting there and back - I am planning on going by bus - I think this will be fine.

    2) What to do with change of clothes and shoes?

    I am guessing most people leave their gear in their car, but as I am travelling by bus I obviously won't have this convenience. What to do? Turn up in my running gear and not care, I don't really want to run the race carrying my gear, leave my stuff somewhere?

    3) Do I need any of the regulation gear for this race? Map, compass?

    I think that's it, of course I am a 100% newbie at this race business, so I am more than open to any suggestions, tips, etc.

    Thanking ye kindly
    On point 1), aren't you lucky to have a bus service over the hill from Hebden Bridge to Keighley on Sundays?

    On point 2), I travel to races by train and/or bicycle. If I have my bicycle, I just tend to leave my change of clothes and shoes in the panniers on the bike. Otherwise, I do what Chris K says; yes, I have sat in train carriages with clean clothes over my smelly running kit.

    Travs has answered point 3) comprehensively. Most fell runners get into the habit of taking all the kit in the list to every race, even where the organiser doesn't specify any kit requirements.
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  6. #6
    Senior Member DangerMouse's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone - that sorts me out nicely

    Busses - yes - one an hour until early evening:

    https://bustimes.org/services/b3-kei...ate=2019-09-15

    I'm not sure I would say lucky though, more "well, it's not bad, but the people deserve better"

    Biking isn't a bad idea, but I wouldn't want to leave my bike locked up anywhere, I have had more stolen than I can remember.

    It's a really good point about taking all the required kit, I should probably be training with it too.

    I just picked up a nice pair of waterproof trousers from the local shop in town, 20 and they are as small and as light as you like, taped seams, and their own little carry pouch. Mac in a sac I think they are called.

    Thanks again - all input very much appreciated

  7. #7
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by DangerMouse View Post
    Biking isn't a bad idea, but I wouldn't want to leave my bike locked up anywhere, I have had more stolen than I can remember.
    I've never had a bike stolen, in the more than 50 years since I was given my first one; but my son has had two stolen, and he's younger than both of my current bikes. I think the secret to preventing theft must be letting the frame get pockmarked and rusty, using naff components, etc.
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonykay View Post
    I've never had a bike stolen, in the more than 50 years since I was given my first one; but my son has had two stolen, and he's younger than both of my current bikes. I think the secret to preventing theft must be letting the frame get pockmarked and rusty, using naff components, etc.
    But Anthony, carbon fibre doesn't rust?!?!
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  9. #9
    Senior Member Chris K's Avatar
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    I think there would be a severe riding accident if someone stole one of my modified bikes - levers may not do the things you expect them to do.
    A circular route mostly downhill

  10. #10
    Senior Member DangerMouse's Avatar
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    Heh, carbon fibre... I wish!!

    I agree about the old beaten up bikes not being very steal-able, but they're also not as much fun as the new tech bikes, the leaps and bounds made by bike designers in recent years is breathtaking!

    I have a modest entry level mountain bike and it's ridiculous - point it at something you think you will never get over in a million years, press the pedal and then gawp in awe at what you just did! They are fantastic!! Highly recommended trying them out if you like that kind of thing - stupidly good fun!!

    Chris K - yep - worst one was I'd spent 3 years restoring an old Kona Explosif, I had literally just put the finishing touches to it and the f*ckers nicked it. Never got it back.

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