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Thread: e-bike

  1. #141
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    Took the Scott e-bike up Howtown zig-zags this evening.

    Really is a case of using the gears as if you were using a normal bike, and just letting it assist and do its thing. But onto the zigzags.... in low gear, went up them between 12-13mph without breaking sweat or even nearly needing to get of of the seat. Kirkstone may prove a tougher test... there's a knack to it, but was a promising first trial.

  2. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travs View Post
    Took the Scott e-bike up Howtown zig-zags this evening.
    Too late to see Sabrina flash past.
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  3. #143
    I will probably buy an ebike for my 72yr old Mum. She would rather drive but very likely she will lose her licence soon. Never been into sport etc.
    Anything that I should bear in mind?

  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambatte View Post
    I will probably buy an ebike for my 72yr old Mum. She would rather drive but very likely she will lose her licence soon. Never been into sport etc.
    Anything that I should bear in mind?
    in my view and speaking in terms of maximum convenience, get the best motor available in your budget

  5. #145
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    On the motor front depending on what your mother wants you need to choose between either a Torque sensing motor or a Cadence sensing motor. With the Torque sensing motor you you need to pedal harder to go faster i.e. a more natural cycling experience offering some training benefits, where as the cadence sensing motor you just have to rotate the pedals and get assisted with the same amount of power regardless of how hard you pedal.

    Also bear in mind anything above a 250 watts motor is illegal on the roads here.
    Last edited by JohnK; 10-05-2021 at 12:10 PM.
    The older I get the Faster I was

  6. #146
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travs View Post
    I purchased a Scott ebike today. Had been tempted by the sexiness of the Bianchi Aria and Impulso ebikes, but went with practicality over looks in the end...

    the Scott hybrid bike having a far bigger battery, more powerful motor, and being already fitted with standard necessities for me such as full mudguards, lights and a storage rack.
    As it's four months, to the day, since you bought your e-bike, for the benefit of those considering buying one can you tell us of your experiences, positive and negative, and general recommendations if you were buying one now?

  7. #147
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    Positives...

    - it's not so much boosting the top speed (i've never even topped 40mph)... but the ease in which you get up to speed... a couple of pedals and you're up to 15/16mph... it just pushes average speed right up. On twisty narrow Lakeland roads (eg Pooley Bridge to Howtown) i can pretty much keep up with cars.

    - all of the above invariably comes with little to no effort.

    - hills: No effort required at all.

    Negatives

    - obviously the cost. i paid over 3 grand for mine, but i am glad i did so, and didn't pay less for something inferior.

    - if i'm being picky, i wish the motors weren't limited to 15/16mph in the UK (mine actually cuts out around 17mph).... it's just a funny speed where it's easier to coast along at 15mph with no effort, than to ride along at 18-20mph but having to put the effort in yourself. 15/16mph doesn't feel quite quick enough, and i wish the motors stayed up to perhaps 20mph.. i couldn't see that being any more dangerous.

    - security... as JohnK alluded to, i'm sure expensive e-bikes (indeed any kind of expensive bike) is a target for thieves, and there's always a nagging doubt when i leave it locked to some fence in a busy car park... that said, i've had absolutely no issues and often leave it in some prime spots in the Lakes... i did though spend 100 on a serious lock. And the insurance to cover the bike is actually more than the contents insurance for my household belongings!

    -weight: probably not an issue on a road e-bike... but my hybrid with a powerful motor is pretty heavy, and if you are lifting over dry stone walls, fences etc, to lock up (or in my case i lift it over a fence at the farm where i live), its a potential issue for those who might not be strong enough

    Overall, for anyone who is already reasonably fit its a fine alternative to car travel for going moderate distances with little to no effort.

    If i was a cycling purist like yourself (and others on here), i'd probably go for a specific road e-bike which would have a smaller motor, but would retain a more traditional cycling feeling, and would considerably boost your range for a long ride.

    For those who just want to travel the furthest distance for the least effort, do what i did and buy the best trekking/hybrid bike your budget can afford.
    Last edited by Travs; 03-08-2021 at 02:13 PM.

  8. #148
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travs View Post
    Positives...

    - it's not so much boosting the top speed (i've never even topped 40mph)... but the ease in which you get up to speed... a couple of pedals and you're up to 15/16mph... it just pushes average speed right up. On twisty narrow Lakeland roads (eg Pooley Bridge to Howtown) i can pretty much keep up with cars.

    - all of the above invariably comes with little to no effort.

    - hills: No effort required at all.

    Negatives

    - obviously the cost. i paid over 3 grand for mine, but i am glad i did so, and didn't pay less for something inferior.

    - if i'm being picky, i wish the motors weren't limited to 15/16mph in the UK (mine actually cuts out around 17mph).... it's just a funny speed where it's easier to coast along at 15mph with no effort, than to ride along at 18-20mph but having to put the effort in yourself. 15/16mph doesn't feel quite quick enough, and i wish the motors stayed up to perhaps 20mph.. i couldn't see that being any more dangerous.

    - security... as JohnK alluded to, i'm sure expensive e-bikes (indeed any kind of expensive bike) is a target for thieves, and there's always a nagging doubt when i leave it locked to some fence in a busy car park... that said, i've had absolutely no issues and often leave it in some prime spots in the Lakes... i did though spend 100 on a serious lock. And the insurance to cover the bike is actually more than the contents insurance for my household belongings!

    -weight: probably not an issue on a road e-bike... but my hybrid with a powerful motor is pretty heavy, and if you are lifting over dry stone walls, fences etc, to lock up (or in my case i lift it over a fence at the farm where i live), its a potential issue for those who might not be strong enough

    Overall, for anyone who is already reasonably fit its a fine alternative to car travel for going moderate distances with little to no effort.

    If i was a cycling purist like yourself (and others on here), i'd probably go for a specific road e-bike which would have a smaller motor, but would retain a more traditional cycling feeling, and would considerably boost your range for a long ride.

    For those who just want to travel the furthest distance for the least effort, do what i did and buy the best trekking/hybrid bike your budget can afford.
    Thanks for your thorough, objective, and well put together report; I hope that other people reading it, both now and in the future, will also find it interesting and useful.

    I did note that you said the motor on your bike cut out around 17mph, (they are supposed to be legally limited to 15.5mph), which might explain why I've had e-bikes come back at me on hills (they're not very steep or long around here) at speeds of over 15mph

  9. #149
    Quote Originally Posted by Travs View Post
    Positives...

    - it's not so much boosting the top speed (i've never even topped 40mph)... but the ease in which you get up to speed... a couple of pedals and you're up to 15/16mph... it just pushes average speed right up. On twisty narrow Lakeland roads (eg Pooley Bridge to Howtown) i can pretty much keep up with cars.

    - all of the above invariably comes with little to no effort.

    - hills: No effort required at all.

    Negatives

    - obviously the cost. i paid over 3 grand for mine, but i am glad i did so, and didn't pay less for something inferior.

    - if i'm being picky, i wish the motors weren't limited to 15/16mph in the UK (mine actually cuts out around 17mph).... it's just a funny speed where it's easier to coast along at 15mph with no effort, than to ride along at 18-20mph but having to put the effort in yourself. 15/16mph doesn't feel quite quick enough, and i wish the motors stayed up to perhaps 20mph.. i couldn't see that being any more dangerous.

    - security... as JohnK alluded to, i'm sure expensive e-bikes (indeed any kind of expensive bike) is a target for thieves, and there's always a nagging doubt when i leave it locked to some fence in a busy car park... that said, i've had absolutely no issues and often leave it in some prime spots in the Lakes... i did though spend 100 on a serious lock. And the insurance to cover the bike is actually more than the contents insurance for my household belongings!

    -weight: probably not an issue on a road e-bike... but my hybrid with a powerful motor is pretty heavy, and if you are lifting over dry stone walls, fences etc, to lock up (or in my case i lift it over a fence at the farm where i live), its a potential issue for those who might not be strong enough

    Overall, for anyone who is already reasonably fit its a fine alternative to car travel for going moderate distances with little to no effort.

    If i was a cycling purist like yourself (and others on here), i'd probably go for a specific road e-bike which would have a smaller motor, but would retain a more traditional cycling feeling, and would considerably boost your range for a long ride.

    For those who just want to travel the furthest distance for the least effort, do what i did and buy the best trekking/hybrid bike your budget can afford.
    I was unlocking my bike, dressed in all the gear, from a bike rack when I noticed next to it a huge ebike: Bosch motor, lights, mudgards, pannier rack - built like a tank. I was just looking when a young man of around 17 arrived. I hadn't said a word when he sheepishly said "Yes. I am afraid it is my bike".

    I might have said "And why?" or something and he basically outlined all the above saying that on it he could see far more of the countryside than he ever would if he was having to pedal. That it could surge up some of the very steep climbs in Ilkley (when I might be on 34/29). All of which is undoubtedly true.

    He was friendly, articulate, well-spoken, well-dressed, polite (he complimented me on my Bianchi!) and we chatted for a few minutes.

    I asked who had paid for the bike (thinking it might be some eccentric rich uncle) and he said that he had (did I mention that he looked comfortably off?)

    So...it was all very interesting. I have talked with e-bike owners before of course, but never one young enough to be my (great?) grandson.


    And today 40 miles (2400 feet) through Harrogate. Harrogate believes it's posh but with beer at 1.99 a pint - not that posh.
    Last edited by Graham Breeze; 03-08-2021 at 08:09 PM.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  10. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Thanks for your thorough, objective, and well put together report; I hope that other people reading it, both now and in the future, will also find it interesting and useful.

    I did note that you said the motor on your bike cut out around 17mph, (they are supposed to be legally limited to 15.5mph), which might explain why I've had e-bikes come back at me on hills (they're not very steep or long around here) at speeds of over 15mph
    I think it probably does begin to ramp down at around 15.5-16mph... but it doesn't just cut out immediately, so there is still some residual assistance on mine at around 17mph.

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