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Thread: Soft Fruit

  1. #1
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    Soft Fruit

    I know that a few Forumites on here grow soft fruit and, having just picked another 6lb of Autumn fruiting raspberries, wondered how everyone has fared this year.

    My Blackcurrants and Gooseberries were slightly disappointing having been knocked back by one of the late frosts we had and although numerous, the size and plumpness was not up to much.

    Red Currants were fantastic but I don't do much with them and let a neighbour and the birds have what they want.

    Early and Summer fruiting Raspberries were average and were battered by wind. We are just over 800' above sea-level and very exposed.

    However my Autumn fruiting Raspberries have been fantastic. The best ever, and, as long as the frost keeps away should keep going for another week or 10 days. Many of them have been weighing over 1/4 of an ounce each. Some have gone silvery from windburn but fine for jam.

    I have already decided to stop growing many spuds as it is hard work for little return and will plant more fruit bushes/canes. I will still put in a few Pink Fir Apple though!
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  2. #2
    Moderator noel's Avatar
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    Lots of gooseberries this year for me. Raspberries haven't been good for a few years - I think the plants are getting old. Courgettes are still going well. But the star of this year have been the sugar snap peas.

    We're pretty high up and windy too. The frosts and winds meant we didn't get any apples this year. Gardening in the hills is like spread betting.
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    Master PeteS's Avatar
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    Lower down and a bumper crop of figs followed by similar in apples. Raspberries have been OK but strawberries were very abundant this year thanks to the hot spring.
    Blackcurrants have been poor in quantity but have had fewer larger fruits.
    Blackberries have been OK and had some greengages this year thanks to a milder spring - a late frost has had them for the last few years.

    Looks like a good crop of parsnips this year and perpetual spinach has been good. More in the greenhouse now for overwintering.

    Cavelo Nero is going strong and will see us through to April.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteS View Post
    a bumper crop of figs
    I've had a couple of fig trees for a few years, but no fruit apart from 4 or 5 which have formed but never come to much before the cold weather has killed them off. Are you doing anything in particular in order to get edible fruit? And I think I read somewhere that boiled fig leaves are edible. (Although, of course, something being edible doesn't necessarily mean that it's nice or worth preparing!) Have you ever tried eating the leaves?

    Plenty of apples and pears, although just about every one has large holes where the birds have pecked at them. I spread a few windfalls around the rest of the garden, in the hope that the birds will concentrate on them and leave the fruit on the trees alone, but they just won't play by the rules.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flem View Post
    I've had a couple of fig trees for a few years, but no fruit apart from 4 or 5 which have formed but never come to much before the cold weather has killed them off. Are you doing anything in particular in order to get edible fruit? And I think I read somewhere that boiled fig leaves are edible. (Although, of course, something being edible doesn't necessarily mean that it's nice or worth preparing!) Have you ever tried eating the leaves?
    .
    I've not eaten fig leaves but when we had a grape vine (sadly now removed), we used to eat the leaves stuffed with various fillings and poached in stock and lemon juice. I'm not sure the leaves taste of much but the filling makes them palatable.

    The secret to getting figs to fruit is to restrict their roots. I only have the one tree - a brown turkey - I planted it in a pit about 2-3 feet wide and deep and then filled with a layer of rubble on the base. It has a wall on one side and the other 3 sides have broken paving slabs. The roots can still get out but it puts the tree under a bit of stress so it will tend to focus on fruit rather then leaf.

    Figs also fruit twice a year in a warm climate so any small fruit on the tree now should be picked off as it will not ripen in our cold winter/spring. It will hopefully put all its energy into next summer's fruit instead.

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    Had a few wild plums while golfing yesterday.

    Very nice.

    Going back today to stock the fruit bowl.

  7. #7
    Master mr brightside's Avatar
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    There's a silly patch of weeds near the end of my drive which produces good blackberries due to being knotted up with old brambles. It's gone off the boil a bit recently, but earlier in the month i was feasting daily as i left for work.
    Can't climb for toffee...

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    Our spaniel has developed a fascination for eating blackberries this year - only ripe ones mind! Anyone else’s dogs have this habit?

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichA View Post
    Our spaniel has developed a fascination for eating blackberries this year - only ripe ones mind! Anyone else’s dogs have this habit?
    Yes. One of my springers eats them directly off the briar. Like yours, only ripe ones, I suspect because they come away easier rather that tasting better.

    Its not stopped him eating sheep shit though!
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    Admin brett's Avatar
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    Both my previous and current Black Labs have eaten blackberries straight from the bramble.

    Unfortunately, the young dog Jess, developed a liking for Victoria plums...


    Quote Originally Posted by RichA View Post
    Our spaniel has developed a fascination for eating blackberries this year - only ripe ones mind! Anyone else’s dogs have this habit?

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