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Thread: Wansfell Uphill only

  1. #1
    Senior Member Duncan R's Avatar
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    Wansfell Uphill only

    Just to confirm that, although the International Youth Cup has been moved to next July we will be going ahead with the Wansfell evening uphill only race planned originally for the night before the International, on Friday October 16th.
    We hope to use it to help with funding the Youth Cup in Ambleside next year, as well as to test our systems for next years event and have an enjoyable evenings racing.

    It is a Time Trial format with online entry at SI -

    https://www.sientries.co.uk/event.ph...&event_id=6799

    We've worked hard to make sure we are within Covid guidelines, minimizing risk as much as we can. Details are on the SI entries page.

    The event is open for two hours, between 6.00pm & 8.00pm with runners departing every 30 seconds at a time chosen upon entry. Numbers with barcodes & names, collected ten minutes before each runners start time, will be scanned at the start to activate the timer and at the finish to give times. Competitors will also be scanned on returning to the start to ensure everyone is accounted for.

    Each finishers time will be uploaded live instantly on to a website, the link to which to be put up nearer the time.

    As it is uphill only, a descent will also be flagged away from the race and we ask runners to walk or jog as they come down.

    It will be dark, obviously, so head-torches will be mandatory (as well as masks and a jacket)although we do plan to have some big lights from the local rescue team lighting up the flagged route.

    Matt Bland has kindly offered some vouchers for prizes which we'll use for 5 spot prizes for all finishers drawn immediately after the event.

    Any questions probably best to email as I'm not on here as much as I once was, but obviously will check in here occasionally.

    Many thanks. Here is to an enjoyable,low key, safe and fun evenings racing.

    Cheers
    Duncan
    "You have brains in your head, your feet in your shoes, you can steer yourself in any direction you choose". Dr Seuss.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Derby Tup's Avatar
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    Good luck with the event Duncan
    Poacher turned game-keeper

  3. #3
    Senior Member Duncan R's Avatar
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    Many thanks, it should be fun. And quick, some fast uns entered, 100 in so far....
    "You have brains in your head, your feet in your shoes, you can steer yourself in any direction you choose". Dr Seuss.

  4. #4
    Thanks Duncan for a very well organised race.

    Good to be back in the saddle last night for my first race since Feb, even if uphill only is not really my forte. Hoping it wont be as long till my next race!

    Results - http://results.opentracking.co.uk/event/wansfell20

  5. #5
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    I'd have loved to have been there, but there was no way i could squeeze in a Lakes trip this weekend.

    Looking at the results, it was clearly a high-class field.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Travs View Post
    I'd have loved to have been there, but there was no way i could squeeze in a Lakes trip this weekend.

    Looking at the results, it was clearly a high-class field.
    Very high class. And me.
    Sincere thanks to everyone involved in organising it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Duncan R's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. Very lucky with the weather, gorgeous evening, marshals saying they watched the stars emerge, saw mars, even spied the space station crossing, which does take a lot of organising tbh... But deeply appreciative thanks to all competitors, who put up with all the various requirements we had to ask of people with good humour and patience.
    James Kirby's pictures look great and it'll take some run to beat Jacob's time. Would have been interesting if up & down, he'd have been very close to Kenny's record I reckon.
    "You have brains in your head, your feet in your shoes, you can steer yourself in any direction you choose". Dr Seuss.

  8. #8
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    Hello Duncan...

    Is there any possibility at all of the traditional up-and-down race over xmas being on, in a similar format?

    Cheers,
    Pete

  9. #9
    Wansfell Uphill Only Race

    The thought of entering a race whereby only the ascent is contested doesn’t exactly fill me with competitive optimism. I’ve always favoured the descents and consider them a just reward following a tiresome climb. There really is no feeling like racing downhill; typically in a seemingly uncontrolled manner as you pit your wits against fellow competitors and the force of gravity. It’s an experience that presents an unrivalled connection with youthfulness; typified by momentary feelings of contentment and joy...totally invigorating. Therefore, I couldn’t really get overly enthused for a race devoid of descent. Whenever it crossed my mind to register I’d sense myself frowning with uncertainty - dawdling and pausing with indecision. Then following an encounter with Mr Badger, I simply had an overwhelming urge to race up a hill.

    It’s Saturday afternoon, just less than a week before Wansfell Uphill and I’m sat on a bench in Chorley town centre. My wife advises me to be careful as apparently I’m sat where the town’s ‘characters’ congregate. I promised to be vigilant as she headed towards Booths to buy our favourite pork, apple and cider sausages. Almost immediately I’m joined by a stylishly dapper middle aged gentleman who’s dressed to the nines in a three-piece tweed suit. He complemented his look with brown leather brogues, a trilby hat and a pocket handkerchief. I noticed he walked with a swagger; large purposeful strides signified confidence and high self-esteem. He sat down beside me and judging by his upright posture it’s clearly obvious he’s been taught never to slouch. He then doffed his hat and formally introduced himself, “hello I’m Mr Badger, I’m delighted to make your acquaintance”. Admittedly I was taken aback, for people from my hometown don’t normally speak or act in such a manner. He then informed me he was passing through Chorley on business, I nodded in acknowledgment. Mr Badger had certainly caught my attention; I couldn’t decide whether he was funny ha-ha or funny peculiar? I was also intrigued by his unusual name but refrained from enquiring as I didn’t want to appear rude and intrusive...surely it must’ve been a nickname? I started to look for telltale signs; distinguishing features indicating badger characteristics - stocky build, short legs, long finger nails, etc. I struggled to make a badger themed connection with the elegant gentleman beside me. Feeling slightly puzzled I duly switched my attention towards Nellie my dog.

    Whilst pampering Nellie, I concluded that maybe I was simply overthinking things and Mr Badger was his actual surname. After all, my wife once worked with a bloke called Bill Beaver who really should’ve been a rockstar given his name, but alas he was a bank clerk. I also once heard about a bloke called Weasel who lived in Blackburn. He was small in stature with a mischievous presence - always scurrying about in a menacing manner. He was my mates next door neighbour and was once cautioned for stealing ladies underwear from the neighbourhood washing lines. My mate was really troubled by the antics of Weasel; he couldn’t understand why his wife’s knickers were the only ones that Weasel hadn’t stolen. I tried reassuring my mate by suggesting that maybe Weasel thought stealing the underwear of his next door neighbour as being too close to home - akin to shitting on his own doorstep. My mate reluctantly agreed. Furthermore, my mates wife was ridiculed by her own friends for being the only lady in the street not to receive Weasel’s unsavoury attention. It’s fair to say, they’re a strange breed from Blackburn...similarities shared with folk from Burnley and Wigan.

    Just as I was about to ask Mr Badger what his business involves, he stood up sharply and bid his farewell by once more doffing his hat. Only this time revealing a Mallen streak of white hair in amongst predominantly dark hair. If only I’d noticed earlier, I’d have saved myself an abundance of head-scratching. I was also surprised to notice that during his hasty departure Mr Badger had further displayed his animalistic side by silently breaking wind and leaving me in the backdraft of his flatulence. Discretion certainly wasn’t his middle name, his actions not exactly the decorum befitting of a gentleman, who’s palate seemingly relished a Greggs cheese and onion bake. In truth, based from experience the savoury bakes do have a tendency to repeat...repeatedly. At that moment I decided Mr Badger wasn’t funny ha-ha or funny peculiar - he was simply a pompous dickhead.

    Whilst wafting away Mr Badger’s ‘scent’ another ‘character’ made an appearance and occupies the empty seat beside me. My new bench mate was somewhat less eloquently dressed than the rude Mr Badger. He’s slovenly clothed from head to toe in athleisure wear, he also carried a tatty shopping bag bearing the ironic slogan: I’m terribly posh, I’m from Chorley. At precisely that moment, I vacated the area as I’d had enough excitement for one day. It’s times like these my feelings towards race day nostalgia grow with each passing week of inactivity. The moment I arrived home I registered for Wansfell Uphill. I was craving some form of normality and finally welcomed the thought of racing uphill with (socially distanced) open arms.

    When I arrived in Ambleside for the race, I instantly noticed the various pandemic regulations that had been put into place. Registration was situated outside with a socially distanced one way queuing system in operation. When required all participants appeared to be wearing some form of face covering and practicing the rule of six. The race was run with staggered starts of 30 second intervals with each runner choosing their start time online to avoid overcrowding on the night - runners started between 6pm-8pm. The route was marked with flags and all competitors were required to carry a head torch. Admittedly, I was initially reluctant about racing uphill but credit where it’s due it was a fantastic event and a memorable night. Many thanks to Duncan and all his helpers for giving us the opportunity during these testing times to participate and experience the buzz of racing once again...beltin!

    Driving home after the race I’m listening to ‘In The Land Of Grey And Pink’ by Caravan. It’s an album I would often listen to with my late grandad Bob. It always evokes pleasant memories and recently I’ve been playing it most days. Maybe subconsciously I’m reacting against the pandemic by remaining upbeat whilst enjoying whimsical lyrics and relaxing music. My wife’s not convinced by the brilliance of Caravan. Alison says the instrumentals sound like the music you’d hear in blue movies from the 70’s. Alison’s comparison does make me laugh. I’m surprised that after all these years I can still see the excitement on my mate Carl’s face whenever he’d found a ‘bluey’ in his dad’s sock drawer. Happy times, I’m sure they’ll return.

    So... I think I might be losing an uphill battle whereby Caravan and my wife are concerned but on a positive note - Wansfell Uphill certainly won me over.

    Every cloud!
    Darren Fishwick, Chorley.

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