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Thread: Walking to running ratio

  1. #1

    Walking to running ratio

    Hi all, starting to get unreasonably fixated on this for next year, and have even found a few volunteers/partner to try with! Trying to plan training and was wondering what the ratio of walking to running is? I've got the 10,000ft vertical in mind (and thanks to everyone who contributed to that thread) but any other tips/advice appreciated! Lupi

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Lupi View Post
    Hi all, starting to get unreasonably fixated on this for next year, and have even found a few volunteers/partner to try with! Trying to plan training and was wondering what the ratio of walking to running is? I've got the 10,000ft vertical in mind (and thanks to everyone who contributed to that thread) but any other tips/advice appreciated! Lupi
    Very simply, walk the ups and run/trot the alongs and the downs. Doddlesville

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Yes, trot the flat and down, walk the up. Eat constantly.

  4. #4
    So, all things considered being a 'strong' walker and being able to maintain a high pie per mile input is recommended. Given lots of up, would 2/3 to 1/3 run/walking be about right for a 23.59min schedule..?

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Derby Tup's Avatar
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    Someone told me it’s about 6 hours running to 18 hours walking

    6hours at say 5mph is 30 miles

    18hours at say 2mph is 36 miles

    Q E D
    Poacher turned game-keeper

  6. #6
    Master Hank's Avatar
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    Personally I think it's quite difficult to quantify the time you might spend walking vs running. Probably any 20hr+ round is going to be majority walking, trotting sections where you feel comfortable doing so. Not sure there's a lot value in trying to put specific numbers on it.

    I guess it goes without saying, but don't run too much too soon. Save the legs so you can keep some kind of pace later on. On my first attempt I ran (well, slowly jogged) a fair bit of the Skiddaw climb and finished leg 1 about 45 minutes up. Needless to say, I didn't finish the round. Second time I was barely on 24hr pace at the end of leg 2, but took time out of my schedule on legs 3 and 4 and finished with time in the bank.

    In training I always found it useful to think of the overall pace needed, which for a sub-24 is, give or take, about 3mph and 350m of ascent/descent every hour. For longer runs/days out looking at what I'd done in relation to that pacing gave me a sense of how realistic an attempt would be. If you can regularly hold that pace or better with some comfort for an 8hr day, chances are you're in a position to have a good go at the round.
    Geoff Clarke
    Lancaster Runners

  7. #7
    Thanks Hank (and all other replies) all that's really useful advice and gives me a good idea of how to set up training; big days out in the hills maintaing the pace.
    Cheers, Lupi.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Derby Tup's Avatar
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    10,000 to 13,000 feet per week in the Lakes (or Snowdonia) and you’ll get your 40 to 50 miles. Focus on the ascent and very importantly descent and you’ll be fine

  9. #9
    Practice/get in the habit of eating/drinking on the move. Makes a world of difference, especially later on. Make time to build this into your training outings and get it down pat.

  10. #10
    Master Bob's Avatar
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    This thread needs renaming to "Walking/staggering ratio"
    Bob

    http://bobwightman.co.uk/run/bob_graham.php

    Without me you'd be one place nearer the back

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