Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 43

Thread: A Cautionary reminder

  1. #1
    Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Cumbria
    Posts
    1,996

    A Cautionary reminder

    I hope Nick doesn`t mind me posting this on here:-

    https://www.ukhillwalking.com/articl...ary_tale-13350
    Last edited by JohnK; 11-02-2021 at 08:18 PM.
    The older I get the Faster I was

  2. #2
    I think Nick makes a lot of very valid points but personally I still struggle to resolve the issue of taking a mobile phone. My thinking goes along the lines that because it can't be relied on to work when you need it none of my decisions on the hill should be based on the perception that I can dial up for help if I need it. It follows that on that basis I should only do things that I'm happy to do (ie prepared to accept the risk) without one. So I don't carry one but do have most of the other kit Nick suggests - I was out yesterday and had microspikes, spare warm layers, bivi bag, food etc.
    I think the problem with mobiles is that there is a danger of making decisions based on the assumption that they will work - therefore some people will expose themselves to a greater degree of risk than they would normally on that basis. The false security of a mobile can override sound judgement.
    Having said that I don't think I'm a luddite, I carry a VHF and a PLB when I'm sea kayaking and I use a GPS watch (but NEVER to navigate!). Perhaps I'm just of the generation to whom mobile phones are inextricably associated with yuppies - I'm typing this in one though, although I don't take it out with me,except in the car as there don't seem to many AA boxes around any more.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark G View Post
    ...except in the car as there don't seem too many AA boxes around any more.
    When I was young and my parents lived in Lancashire if they were traveling to, say, Cornwall on holiday the AA would provide a free typed route description of every road and turn for their journey, particularly noting all the AA boxes.

    But unlike a satnav it did not say "recalculating" if we made an error.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  4. #4
    Master Travs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Coventry
    Posts
    3,917
    I remember using the AA atlas to prepare routes to our holidays to the beach resorts of Wales in the 80's and early 90's.

    Was always interesting, particularly as our car couldn't always be relied upon to behave on motorways, so generally had to string the towns together.

    My mum's annual holiday to Dyffryn Ardudwy in the 50's and 60's was apparently an all-day journey, thanks to their car habitually breaking down, and my grandad's insistence on stopping every half hour for a fag and cup of tea (often the first stop was barely outside of Coventry).

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    143
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark G View Post
    I think Nick makes a lot of very valid points but personally I still struggle to resolve the issue of taking a mobile phone. My thinking goes along the lines that because it can't be relied on to work when you need it none of my decisions on the hill should be based on the perception that I can dial up for help if I need it. It follows that on that basis I should only do things that I'm happy to do (ie prepared to accept the risk) without one. So I don't carry one but do have most of the other kit Nick suggests - I was out yesterday and had microspikes, spare warm layers, bivi bag, food etc.
    I think the problem with mobiles is that there is a danger of making decisions based on the assumption that they will work - therefore some people will expose themselves to a greater degree of risk than they would normally on that basis. The false security of a mobile can override sound judgement.
    Having said that I don't think I'm a luddite, I carry a VHF and a PLB when I'm sea kayaking and I use a GPS watch (but NEVER to navigate!). Perhaps I'm just of the generation to whom mobile phones are inextricably associated with yuppies - I'm typing this in one though, although I don't take it out with me,except in the car as there don't seem to many AA boxes around any more.
    You make a good point there Mark and I agree with the main thrust of this.

  6. #6
    Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ambleside
    Posts
    3,847
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark G View Post
    I think Nick makes a lot of very valid points but personally I still struggle to resolve the issue of taking a mobile phone. My thinking goes along the lines that because it can't be relied on to work when you need it none of my decisions on the hill should be based on the perception that I can dial up for help if I need it. It follows that on that basis I should only do things that I'm happy to do (ie prepared to accept the risk) without one. So I don't carry one but do have most of the other kit Nick suggests - I was out yesterday and had microspikes, spare warm layers, bivi bag, food etc.
    I think the problem with mobiles is that there is a danger of making decisions based on the assumption that they will work - therefore some people will expose themselves to a greater degree of risk than they would normally on that basis. The false security of a mobile can override sound judgement.
    Having said that I don't think I'm a luddite, I carry a VHF and a PLB when I'm sea kayaking and I use a GPS watch (but NEVER to navigate!). Perhaps I'm just of the generation to whom mobile phones are inextricably associated with yuppies - I'm typing this in one though, although I don't take it out with me,except in the car as there don't seem to many AA boxes around any more.
    I don't carry a mobile phone - I don't have one - just my GPS watch.

  7. #7
    Master ba-ba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Captain Cook's Great Ayton
    Posts
    1,678
    I generally agree with the not making decisions based on having a working phone in signal. Assuming all you have is the non-electronic items in your pack is a good rule of thumb.
    However, I would still always carry one on the off chance it did work. I forget it's even in my bag until I take it out upon getting home. I don't think carrying it would cause me to reduce the amount of kit, or indeed the amount of care, I would take, or change my mindset at all. For me personally, I see carrying a phone as having no downsides.
    Last edited by ba-ba; 13-02-2021 at 04:30 PM.
    Nic Barber. Downhill Dandy

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ba-ba View Post
    For me personally, I see carrying a phone as having no downsides.
    And so helpful if you find you have, say, lost your car keys.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Breeze View Post
    And so helpful if you find you have, say, lost your car keys.
    Unfortunately at the moment my running doesn't involve car keys. Fortunately I live somewhere where I can run without the need for them.

  10. #10
    Master Wheeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Monmouth
    Posts
    7,247
    My wife and I have each other on tracker. Peace of mind if I should ever get 'into difficulty' and become overdue......as long as there is signal!
    I am Kuno....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •