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Thread: Nobby newby biking questions

  1. #31
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    Crossing the aligator and piranha infested river Orinoco (aka Austwick Beck) on today's 15 miler from home. Note my nobby saddle bag, now at long last carrying a spare inner tube (now that I knew which one to buy )

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  2. #32
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    Bloody hell, that came out big

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Fellbeast View Post
    Bloody hell, that came out big
    If you've got it - why not flaunt it?
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  4. #34
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    Great photo. I'd be on the hoods going through water though but having said that I've not got your biceps!
    Visibility good except in Hill Fog

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by mr brightside View Post
    I knew it wouldn't be long before this thread became a new tributary of the grand tidal estuary of factual cycling chat that is 'todays bike ride'.

    As i've been skimming i've noticed someone saying its ok to strain the chain on a 105. Personally, i'd throw the lot in the bin and go SRAM as i've been woefully disappointed with how 105 shifts; especially on the rings. I could scarcely believe my senses when the weather warmed up and i got back on the Colnago which is fitted with DA7800, it was like going from a Trabant to a 5 Series.
    I didn't suggest it was OK to strain the chain, just that I'd been told it was but didn't believe it. My 105 is far far superior to the Ultegra I had on an earlier road bike but that's to be expected about a quarter of a century later!

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Breeze View Post
    I think chains are an engineering miracle. Obviously they stretch and I've just changed my SRAM on the ADV after 1400 miles but at 20 - who cares?, but more than once as I have been standing on the pedals inching up a 25% climb, forty miles from home I have prayed "chain, chain please don't let me down now!
    Mine did, on an earlier tourer (galaxy), absolutely knackered the day after Jura heaving it back over the climb out of Lochranza with full set of panniers. Fortunately I carry a chain tool and spare links.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Breeze View Post
    I think chains are an engineering miracle. Obviously they stretch and I've just changed my SRAM on the ADV after 1400 miles but at 20 - who cares?, but more than once as I have been standing on the pedals inching up a 25% climb, forty miles from home I have prayed "chain, chain please don't let me down now!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark G View Post
    Mine did, on an earlier tourer (galaxy), absolutely knackered the day after Jura heaving it back over the climb out of Lochranza with full set of panniers. Fortunately I carry a chain tool and spare links.
    I have only once snapped a chain once, and it was totally my fault. As it's a serious safety issue it warrants mention on the 'Nobby newby biking questions' thread, so I will explain.

    I started my cycling misadventures on 10 gears; two cogs at the front and 5 at the back, with a chain that hadn't really changed for decades and had rivets that extended nearly a mm beyond each plate of the chain. When fiddling with chains I used my dad's motorcycle rivet extract from the 1940s, and all was well. At 15 I upgraded to 12 gears and kept the chain.

    It wasn't until the late 1980s that 14 gears became affordable, and I entered the world of thin chains where the rivets were nearly flush with the plates. I had to get a proper rivet extractor at this point, as the tolerances were finer. Even so, I would sometimes ride the bike with gears during the week and then take them off and shorten the chain and ride fixed at the weekend. Only to revert back to gears in the week. Have rivet extractor, will use it.

    I missed 16 gears completely, and switched to 18 gears in 2004. No problem, I thought, I've got a rivet extractor and I know how to use it. Second time out I was heading out of Leek, on the A53 towards Buxton on an intended climbing session. At the steepest part of the road, one arrow on the OS map, there was a loud bang from the rear of the bike and the pedal gave way slightly. Amazingly, the chain did not break completely and held all the way to Flash on one side of the chain only. It made a hell of a lot of noise, and I had to ride very carefully, but I safely made it back to the car in Longnor on the shortest route possible. I re-linked the chain properly and still use it - it's a Dura Ace 7700.

    The moral of the tale is that there is a definite way to rivet the chain that you must adhere to, as the rivet you add is not as strong as the factory made ones. Each link has two rivets, and you have to consider the direction of travel. I believe it's the rear rivet you add (although I would strongly recommend you check this on the instructions enclosed with your chain). If you don't follow this, the above tale will happen to you and it could be a lot worse.
    Last edited by Marco; 10-05-2021 at 01:30 PM.

  8. #38
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    Next to all these thousands-of-miles-per-year proper cyclists, I'm very much an occasional cyclist. But we did snap a chain on the tandem last year. I guess there's more force going through it.

    Thankfully we were just setting off, so we turned back into the drive and went for a run instead.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by noel View Post
    Next to all these thousands-of-miles-per-year proper cyclists, I'm very much an occasional cyclist. But we did snap a chain on the tandem last year. I guess there's more force going through it.

    Thankfully we were just setting off, so we turned back into the drive and went for a run instead.
    Carrying the tandem? I'm impressed
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Last autumn one of my mum's neighbours bought a well-equipped £2400 bike from the Lancashire company named after the river. Carbon frame, carbon wheel rims (but with calliper brakes), 105 equipment and a compact 50/34 chainset.

    As I have said, many times, it's very flat around here with the occasional short hill that rarely exceeds 1 in 10. It means for fit, and experienced, cyclists the 50 tooth chainring is all you need. For a newcomer, however, the hills are too steep for the big ring

    I saw his bike after he'd ridden it four times, and less than 100 miles, and there was a visible loss of metal from the outside of the front chainring, which was the result of the shearing action of the chain in the big chainring to biggest sprocket. Based on what I saw, if he continued riding the bike in this way he'd need a new front chainring after 500 miles. He told me that he didn't use the 34 chainring because it was too small. I did wonder why, when spending this amount of money, he didn't specify a 42 inner ring.
    Single chainrings are increasingly popular mainly on gravel and mountain bikes but it's creeping into road bikes aswell. Apparently studies have found that the wear is very minimal and manufacturers are starting to spec them. (anything new gets people spending money)
    Personally I think they look wrong with the huge cassette on the back.
    One step beyond.

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