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Thread: Nobby newby biking questions

  1. #51
    Master mr brightside's Avatar
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    I've never snapped a chain, but when you're only generating about 0.7kw...
    Can't climb for toffee...

  2. #52
    Master mr brightside's Avatar
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    Stolly, you need to find out if your derailleur cage can take a 36t sprocket. Also, if the freewheel on the new wheelset is different to your current one you might need a shim to index the cassette to your existing derailleur position. In laymens terms your new cogs might not line up with your derailleur.
    Can't climb for toffee...

  3. #53
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    Thanks. I may knock the set of cogs on the head for now. I still have no idea if I need a QR converter thingy for the wheels either - as a non-speaker of cyclese it seems bonkers to me that something like that isnít even mentioned by the wheel maker on their web-site. I think itís safe to say that all things bike are aimed considerably over the head of people like me

    Mr B, Iím assuming that watts generation is where itís at. I notice that I get an average power figure on strava thatís given in watts. Watts that all about? Iím guessing the bigger it is, the greater my power

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Fellbeast View Post
    Thanks. I may knock the set of cogs on the head for now. I still have no idea if I need a QR converter thingy for the wheels either - as a non-speaker of cyclese it seems bonkers to me that something like that isnít even mentioned by the wheel maker on their web-site. I think itís safe to say that all things bike are aimed considerably over the head of people like me
    Bike tech. is a mine field and obsessed with jargon. How "slammed" is your head? When I was upgrading a road bike I was moving from a 32 biggest rear cog to a 29 and asked my dealer if he could replace the 29 with a bigger cog and he said "Sure. But I'll need to change the derailleur to "long cage".

    If you are setting out on a bike accumulating crusade you might be advised to develop a relationship with a small dealer who spends his life thinking bikes. It may cost more than buying stuff off the internet but it should save you from making expensive mistakes.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  5. #55
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    I have been reading this thread, with its endless discussions of cogs, cassettes, etc., with a certain amount of wry amusement.

    My bikes have some magic machinery inside a "tin can" in the rear hub. Every 10 to 15 years or so, it stops working properly and has to be replaced. I wouldn't be able to stay mounted going up some of the hills around Fellbeast's or Graham Breeze's localities, but who cares?
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  6. #56
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    To be fair this is probably my first ever new bike and Iím aged 64

  7. #57
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fellbeast View Post
    So continuing with my daft questions, and having now spent getting on for 500 miles 'gaining' experience on my new gravel bike, I'm now thinking of adding to my biking repertoire with an alternative, gnarlier wheel/tyre/rear cassette set up that I can pop on and off, depending on my intended route for the day. To be fair the bike is already pretty gnarly, but I like the idea of being able to mod/twat about with the bike at my whim.

    I appreciate that most of you guys are more geared up for pure road biking stuff but any steerage you can give me would be great either way. I don't want a mountain bike by the way (at least not yet anyway) but do like the idea of making my existing bike more flexible

    My new set up would be with 650b wheels (27.5 inch), wider tyres and maybe a lower set of of rear wheel cogs
    First things first, lets mention the basics before we totally descend down the rabbit hole

    A 700c wheel has a diameter of 700mm when fitted with a pretty substantial tyre. The actual rim has a diameter of 622mm, so with a 39mm wide tyre the maths is 622 + (2x39) =700

    When you mention 650, however, it is important to stress there is a 650A (never seen it) with a rim diameter of 590mm, 650B with a rim diameter of 584mm and 650c with a rim diameter of 571mm

    The two things that strikes me straight away, are that both 650B and 650C are niche sizes in this country, and that they're only a few mm smaller than 700c so won't offer much more width

    Quote Originally Posted by Fellbeast View Post

    My bike frame is 'medium' and with the 700c wheels attached I'm just tall enough to fit comfortably and stand over the crossbar without knackering myself. I've got everything set up well and am really comfortable in the saddle. I am quite small though, at 5 ft 7, so I figure that the 650b wheels will seem a super fit for me, giving me small drop in height and making for a more compact unit. With their smaller circumference they'll also effectively act as a lower gearing I'd guess. I have quick release wheel fittings so I'll need to make sure the new wheels are compatible with this (and maybe need some kind of QR conversion kit?)
    The potential problem of using smaller wheels, and lowering the bike, is that on the rocky rough stuff there will be a much higher risk of clouting a rock whilst pedalling, as the pedals will be lower to the ground. Your ability to pedal around corners, even on the road, will be reduced too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fellbeast View Post

    My existing tyres are 40mm but, with the new wheel size, I'm thinking of some 42mm gravel bike tyres. I think the bike will have sufficient clearance for these (the spec says up to 50mm on the front and 44mm on the back) but I understand that tyres can come up wider than their spec so I may have to be careful with tyre choice
    For only 2mm more width do you actually need to buy new wheels? You are correct about tyre width figures not being totally accurate, and you also need to allow clearance for wheel buckles.

    Last autumn I squeezed 28mm tyres onto my Raleigh that are slightly wider than expected. I have ended up with 1mm clearance on both sides of the tyre, which is fine until I get a buckle from a pothole etc and have to walk as even a spare tube won't save you

    Quote Originally Posted by Fellbeast View Post

    Having done a shed load of internet searching, I've found a possible set up of what might fit the bill:

    Shimano CS-HG50-10 11-36t cassette
    Fulcrum Rapid Red C24 gravel wheelset
    WTB Resolute TCS Light Fast tyres
    I think your possible upgrade spec is good, although not cheap. There are a lot of things to consider, so Graham is correct - a knowledgeable local dealer may cost your more, but you'd end up with something that works.

    My recomendation
    Last edited by Marco; 12-05-2021 at 12:24 PM.

  8. #58
    Senior Member Marco's Avatar
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    I have had a s*** load of problems completing my post, so here is the rest of it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Fellbeast View Post

    Having done a shed load of internet searching, I've found a possible set up of what might fit the bill:

    Shimano CS-HG50-10 11-36t cassette
    Fulcrum Rapid Red C24 gravel wheelset
    WTB Resolute TCS Light Fast tyres
    I think your possible upgrade spec is very good, although not cheap. There are a lot of things to consider, so Graham is correct - a knowledgeable local dealer may cost your more, but you'd end up with something that works. I don't think there is anything unreasonable about what you're proposing, but I don't want anyone to shell out £500 plus on something that might not give you anything more than what you've already got

    My recommendation for now is to borrow a pair of mountain bike wheels to see how they fit, look, and how big a tyre you could actually put on (and you don't have to have the same width front and back). You don't even have to ride the bike, just try it and take measurements

  9. #59
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    And.....Down he goes! Slippery slope/Rabbit hole Ahoy!! Watch out wallet!
    Seriously though Stolly, its great that you're joining in the cycling community. I hover on the periphery, never quite accepting the fact that my fell racing days are over but I do enjoy it. It takes more time than running but its probably better for us at our age!
    I am Kuno....

  10. #60
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    Thanks Wheeze. I am now cranking up a fell running fight back and, after a slow start, I think Iím now back in the game.

    That said Iím sort of aiming for a 4:3 biking to running system - say four bike rides and three runs (or vice versa) each week. There are plenty of rip snorting hills round here to spice up the bike rides and right now my rides are probably tougher than the runs

    Having thought about the bike upgrade, and based on feedback here and some on-line research, Iíve put that on the back burner for now. Iím now not sure if the change will make enough difference over my current set up. And I guess Iíll have a few more pedal strike issues to cope with too. Mind you I think the bike would look fantastic in a slightly lower profile, chunkier tyre mode so itís still a strong possibility at some point

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