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Thread: Nintendo switch

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by molehill View Post
    Above my pay grade, what does Nintendo do?
    Forget that question, I will never understand the answer. Hide under my duvet oggling my Silva compass and still trying to work out why the needle thingy always points to the North.
    When you've worked it out can you explain radio waves and how the sound gets inside my radio? Is it just magic?

    And as for thinking about electricity - that just makes my head hurt.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK View Post
    Get a young gamer to explain it to you
    But not under the duvet
    Visibility good except in Hill Fog

  3. #13
    Master molehill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Breeze View Post
    When you've worked it out can you explain radio waves and how the sound gets inside my radio? Is it just magic?

    And as for thinking about electricity - that just makes my head hurt.
    I can't get any grip on electricity either, many an hour I have spent looking at explanation diagrams and reading how it should be compared to water in a hose pipe. I still fail to comprehend it.
    Don't roll with a pig in poo. You get covered in poo and the pig likes it.

  4. #14
    I was fortunate enough to grow up in Ambleside. When I wasn't swimming in the lakes and rivers, scrambling up Stock Ghyll or discovering how to use a map and compass on a misty loughrigg ( things which people now seem to pay other people to show them how to do) most of us spent many hours clambering all over the rocks in the park. They were polished clean by use, we had loads of routes and abseil points and it was just what we did. Sadly over the years they have fallen in to disuse and it's very rare to see anyone on them nowadays. But a few years ago I was running through the park and saw a young lad part way up a low slab with his Dad encouraging him from the bottom - except when I got in to earshot I discovered his father was telling him to get off there this instant - or he wouldn't be allowed to play on the iPad. How very sad.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark G View Post
    But a few years ago I was running through the park and saw a young lad part way up a low slab with his Dad encouraging him from the bottom - except when I got in to earshot I discovered his father was telling him to get off there this instant - or he wouldn't be allowed to play on the iPad. How very sad.
    Reminds me of when we had a family holiday in North Wales when my son was about 8. Walking below the Ogwen slabs, we stopped to watch the climbers. I turned my back, and when I looked round again, my son's feet were at a higher altitude than my head. He soon worked out that he wasn't able to make the next move, so I guided him back down. He has actually become a very competent boulderer, although tennis is his consuming passion now.
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  6. #16
    Master Travs's Avatar
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    I was always independent and wanted to get outdoors and about as a kid...

    I remember on a school-organised ramble to the Long Mynd i got a massive telling off for leaving everyone way behind across Pole Bank, and then attempting a run down the steep side of Cardingmill Valley where i ended up falling most of the way down (a pointer to my crap descending now).

    First trip to the Lakes i got a massive telling off from my parents for again leaving them way behind on the climb to the summit of Pike O Blisco... and then throwing a massive paddy because after we'd climbed Catbells, Maiden Moor and High Spy, they insisted we turn round, and wouldn't let me complete the rest of the Newlands Round on my own.

    I did feel out of my depth once when me and my dad went climbing round the rocky coast between two sandy bays in Cornwall... i think our attempt at adventure is what is now called "coasteering"

    Before i got into fellrunning, me and my brother liked to pick out unorthodox routes up the Lakeland peaks... not graded scrambles or anything, but making it up as we went along... a rough scramble up Dow Crag from Goats Water, by the side of the real crags.... and up the scree gully through the axe factory onto Pike Of Stickle, etc.
    Last edited by Travs; 25-10-2021 at 11:46 AM.

  7. #17
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    About ten years ago we had an eventful walk up Sca Fell Pike when my son lost an IPod touch.

    Don't judge me for letting him take it on the walk. He liked making videos as well as playing games on it.

    Maybe it was the bribe to get him up the hill.

    Anyway he didn't realise it had gone until half way down the Corridor Route.

    I remember a nice sit down with two small boys while the husband went back to the top looking for the lost item.

    Needless to say it was long gone.

    The pint in the Wasdale Head took the edge off the trauma.

  8. #18
    Master mr brightside's Avatar
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    I used to drink out of puddles when i was a lad, and dig holes in the veg plot with my bare hands. These are the sort of things today's youngsters don't do enough of, that and eating firelighters because they smell nice.
    Luke Appleyard (Wharfedale)- quick on the dissent

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr brightside View Post
    I used to drink out of puddles when i was a lad, and dig holes in the veg plot with my bare hands. These are the sort of things today's youngsters don't do enough of, that and eating firelighters because they smell nice.
    Yes, but did you swallow a lighted match after you had eaten the firelighter?
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  10. #20
    Master molehill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr brightside View Post
    I used to drink out of puddles when i was a lad, and dig holes in the veg plot with my bare hands. These are the sort of things today's youngsters don't do enough of, that and eating firelighters because they smell nice.
    I was kind of with you with you all the way till the last bit
    Don't roll with a pig in poo. You get covered in poo and the pig likes it.

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