Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Magnesium citrate - taking it?

  1. #1
    Moderator Mossdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Teesdale
    Posts
    2,774

    Magnesium citrate - taking it?

    I've just been reading that this might be a beneficial supplement. However, there's so much garbage out there recommending this or that, or the reverse, it's difficult to fathom the bunkum and flapdoodle from fact (a bit like life generally in fact ).
    Am Yisrael Chai

  2. #2
    Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ambleside
    Posts
    5,507
    I found this:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ecommendations

    Some of the references are quite old. Reading the titles I see some studies showed no benefit in those who were Mg replete. Looking at the various foods that have quite a lot of Mg in them I doubt anybody with a healthy diet would be deficient. We rarely checked Mg levels in hospital patients - when we did it was usually in those who had a low K level and were on diuretics.

    Positive studies are of course more likely to be published - nobody wants to read a negative study.

  3. #3
    Moderator Mossdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Teesdale
    Posts
    2,774
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T View Post
    I found this:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ecommendations

    Some of the references are quite old. Reading the titles I see some studies showed no benefit in those who were Mg replete. Looking at the various foods that have quite a lot of Mg in them I doubt anybody with a healthy diet would be deficient. We rarely checked Mg levels in hospital patients - when we did it was usually in those who had a low K level and were on diuretics.

    Positive studies are of course more likely to be published - nobody wants to read a negative study.
    Thanks Mike. My interest came from reading a article yesterday. Here's a copy and paste:


    ‘I take magnesium at night’
    Dr David Clancy, 59
    Lecturer in biogentorology at Lancaster University

    “There’s a fair consensus that most people could benefit from more magnesium. I’ve been researching the delay of age-related illnesses for decades and, in 2005, I did an experiment with fruit flies and looked at a number of interventions to see if they correlated with longer survival. The one that stood out was done with magnesium. The fly strain that lived longest had highest magnesium and the ones that were shortest had lowest magnesium.

    “I’ve been taking 1500mg of magnesium citrate every night since. The citrate form helps with absorption and taking it at night can be helpful because it can help with sleep. It’s also involved in 600 other bodily reactions, including helping potentially with exercise performance and mood regulation.

    “Since that study, more research has linked magnesium levels with healthy ageing and longevity. Low magnesium intake is also linked to increased levels of inflammation, which plays a crucial role in ageing and chronic disease. One review of 11 studies found that magnesium supplements reduced levels of C-reaction protein, a marker of inflammation, in people with chronic inflammation. Magnesium is found in dark green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds and wholegrains.

    “I also take a vitamin D3 supplement. There is a tonne of evidence saying that it’s helpful for the immune system, for bones and the prevention of many chronic illnesses. My work hasn’t focused on it but the epidemiological evidence for it is strong. Plus, in Britain, the fact is, we just don’t get enough sunlight to provide all our vitamin D needs so most of us should be taking supplements.”

    There's was also some suggestion that while magnesium is found in vegetables, the relatively poor quality of soil some veg is grown in leads to the veg taking up less magnesium than expected. I guess the answer is to aim for organic veg as much as possible if availability (and budget) allows for this.
    Am Yisrael Chai

  4. #4
    Master mr brightside's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Loving it in the Pilates Studio
    Posts
    7,874
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T View Post
    Positive studies are of course more likely to be published - nobody wants to read a negative study.
    The 'file drawer problem'.
    Luke Appleyard (Wharfedale)- quick on the dissent

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •