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Thread: Best Books

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr brightside View Post
    There's a disused quarry on greenhow hill opposite the church, I think it's known as duck street quarry. There is a very good level at the far end leading you directly into a sun fracture of the craven fault system. Very much worth climbing over the barbed wire for a look, it was extensively stoped.
    The one I was referring to is Longcliffe Quarry (which I have mentioned on this forum previously, having used it on some of my longer training runs). Much used for rock-climbing https://www.thebmc.co.uk/modules/rad/view.aspx?id=2204 , also this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_czA4j-zjk , or simply lazing around by the "poolside" on sunny Summer days. Now fenced off, much of it with high industrial fencing (but there are ways through), with an impenetrable fence across the track that leads down to the only "beach"; which means that if you jumped in, you wouldn't be able to walk out unless you could scale the fence.
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
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  2. #82
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    Am a few chapters in to Boff's book on Gary Devine, am enjoying it hugely. I wasn't so keen on Run Wild but this is a different book altogether and as much a social commentary on the time as about one exceptional fellrunner. Definitely one for the "must read" pile.
    https://www.gnbooks.co.uk/product/faster-louder/

  3. #83
    [QUOTE=Martyn P;677669]Am a few chapters in to Boff's book on Gary Devine, am enjoying it hugely. I wasn't so keen on Run Wild but this is a different book altogether and as much a social commentary on the time as about one exceptional fellrunner. Definitely one for the "must read" pile.


    I understand the review in The Fellrunner starts:

    Billy Bland reveals, on the cover of this biography of Gary Devine, his admiration for Gary’s
    spirit of individuality as a race winner and Richard Askwith enthuses about its exhilarating
    authenticity. So all I need add is that Faster! Louder! is a brilliant, effervescent, whirlpool of astonishment, revelation and laughter.


    So presumably the reviewer quite liked it as well.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  4. #84
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    This is Going to Hurt. My son's girlfriend left it in the house, I picked it up, and I'm hooked (although only two chapters into it so far).

    By the way, the author Adam Kay is no relation to me (as far as I know). Indeed, since he introduces himself as being from a Jewish family, it is likely that, as in my case, the name Kay was adopted by an ancestor settling down in Britain, as being simpler for the British to pronounce/spell than his original Central European surname.
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonykay View Post
    This is Going to Hurt. My son's girlfriend left it in the house, I picked it up, and I'm hooked (although only two chapters into it so far).

    By the way, the author Adam Kay is no relation to me (as far as I know). Indeed, since he introduces himself as being from a Jewish family, it is likely that, as in my case, the name Kay was adopted by an ancestor settling down in Britain, as being simpler for the British to pronounce/spell than his original Central European surname.
    I only read the section of the book that could be read online for free - I thought he mocked and exploited some of the patients he described, and decided not to buy/read the rest of the book.

    I have only seen one episode of the TV series so far - it has a totally different feel, and I will watch the rest.

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T View Post
    I only read the section of the book that could be read online for free - I thought he mocked and exploited some of the patients he described, and decided not to buy/read the rest of the book.

    I have only seen one episode of the TV series so far - it has a totally different feel, and I will watch the rest.
    I read the book on publication. I thought it very funny but misogynistically unpleasant and ultimately wearing. Kay was a comedian before he qualified as a doctor and has been for most of his life since he left the profession after failing as a doctor. [No shame there. He just followed his father into the profession]. He has therefore had many years of practice writing comedy to produce a well honed book on all that can happen in ops. & gynae.

    A good writer can make anything funny - think The Office - so it isn't difficult with matters pertaining to vaginas and what goes into them and emerges.

    I watched the first episode and recognised the stories from the book: the unsleeving, the kinder toy but, as with the book, I thought the joke or the shock value comes first. Any artist always puts the work first and truth comes nowhere. The great Randy Newman has said he will write about anything (ie the most personal circumstances)if he gets a song out of it.

    In the book it is deliberately left unstated that Kay is gay (but it can be inferred) whereas in the TV show this is a big theme. I suppose having used up many of the good jokes in the first episode he has had to find something to fill out the rest of the series. Writers write what they know about and he knows more about being gay than being a doctor.

    So I watched episode 1 and thought it was OTT to attract viewers, most of episode 2 before getting bored and switching off and then, wondering if I had been too harsh in my judgement, started watching episode 3 and concluded that I hadn't and I would rather watch Visconti's La Terra Trema which has stood the test of time over 70 years.

    I doubt if anyone will be discussing Kay's work in 2092.
    Last edited by Graham Breeze; 12-02-2022 at 09:33 AM.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T View Post
    I only read the section of the book that could be read online for free - I thought he mocked and exploited some of the patients he described, and decided not to buy/read the rest of the book.

    I have only seen one episode of the TV series so far - it has a totally different feel, and I will watch the rest.
    From the two chapters that I have read so far (and I haven't watched the TV series), if he has been mocking anyone, it's the other doctors (and himself). He seems to be quite sympathetic to most of the patients.

    One incident in Chapter 2 that had a resonance with me was where a patient's excrement was a worrying colour, which after much research was diagnosed to be due to severe beetroot consumption. I once went to my GP when my urine was deep red . . .
    In his lifetime he suffered from unreality, as do so many Englishmen.
    Jorge Luis Borges

  8. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonykay View Post
    From the two chapters that I have read so far (and I haven't watched the TV series), if he has been mocking anyone, it's the other doctors (and himself). He seems to be quite sympathetic to most of the patients.

    One incident in Chapter 2 that had a resonance with me was where a patient's excrement was a worrying colour, which after much research was diagnosed to be due to severe beetroot consumption. I once went to my GP when my urine was deep red . . .
    I suggest you drink younger vintages.
    "...as dry as the Atacama desert".

  9. #89
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    Yesterday, my children came back from the library with ‘Wild Fell’ by Lee Schofield.
    He is an ecologist and RSPB manager for Haweswater and their 2 farms there.
    I’ve just finished the first third in which he starkly sets out the lack of biodiversity and flowers, in particular, in the Lakes.
    Very well written and balanced, so far.
    A lot more likeable than the ‘posh’ Rewilding tome based around Knepp and George Monbiot’s contributions.

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