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Thread: What Turbo Trainer

  1. #1

    What Turbo Trainer

    Mrs Dead Edge has rediscovered her running shoes which is great but cuts back on the time I can get out the door (due to kid duties) - so, I fancy getting a turbo trainer - but have absolutely no idea what to go for or where to start . Any advice?
    Patrick (age 3): Daddy, you're all muddy. Have you been for a run!

  2. #2
    Master nikalas's Avatar
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    Tested a load recently for a mag article and it really depends what you want and how much you want to spend.

    ... my thoughts below

    Elite Volare Mag Lite 109.99
    A minor faff to set up requiring the use of an additional socket to compliment the supplied allen key. By far the cheapest trainer on test the build quality, although appearing a tad flimsy, is none the less good. Even with our testers 6ft 3” and 13 stone frame it coped admirably with only a minimal amount of flexing. As with all of the Elite trainers, it whirs away with a pleasantly quiet purr and at lower resistance levels feels silky smooth. We couldn’t really see the point of non-remote adjustable resistance and couldn’t imagine clambering on and off mid-workout to adjust it. We reckon, as it did also suffer slightly from magnetic stickiness at the top of the range, you’d simply leave it set on a low-mid resistance and simply use your gears. With this in mind Elite could surely simply ditch the adjustment and produce a gem of a trainer for under 100. Unsurprisingly for such a budget model there is no training feedback. www.madison.co.uk

    Great value and solidly performing budget product that’d suitable for occasional indoor sessions. 7




    Tacx Sirius Soft Gel Folding Mag Trainer 164.99
    Once you’ve spent an afternoon building the thing (see Tacx Flow), the Sirius is a great little turbo. Build quality is excellent, inspiring confidence during harder efforts and not moving or jumping at all. For almost 15 less than the BBB you get a smoother, quieter and better feeling ride. In fact, this is one of the quietest trainers on test. The handlebar mounted remote adjustment unit offers ten levels of resistance and, although from one level to the next, the increase in intensity is barely discernible jumps of two levels give a good progressive feel. Up at the top end of the range there is a bit of stickiness but, out of the magnetic trainers on test, it suffers least from this fault. Combine it with a decent rear wheel mounted computer with cadence monitor for some feedback and you’ll have your winter training sorted for well under 200. www.fisheroutdoor.co.uk

    Does everything you’d want a basic trainer to do very well and it won’t drive your neighbours mad. 8

    BBB Trainer QR 179.95
    Set-up is pretty easy despite “wing-nut I” not actually existing and in fact being an allen key bolt. Once riding it is probably the noisiest of the turbos on test but, to be honest, it’s a pretty marginal thing and this aspect of turbos has improved dramatically across the board in the last couple of years. It does feel stable and there is no sense of flex and wobble even when giving it some real stick. Resistance is altered using a handlebar mounted lever and offers five levels of resistance. However, although there was a noticeable difference between bottom and top, any incremental increase was almost non-existent. Also, at the highest level there is a slight feeling of stickiness that is often a problem with cheaper magnetic resistance systems. There is no training feedback so again a rear mounted computer would be a good idea. www.greyville.com

    Not bad, but there are better trainers available for the money. 5

    Blackburn Tech Fluid 224.99
    The first thing you notice before you even get the Blackburn out of the box is the sheer weight of the thing. This is a genuine heavyweight contender and, before you even get a bike on it, you know this is one seriously well-engineered and bombproof piece of kit. Right down to the chunky crank handle to secure the bike in place, if the Blackburn were a car, it’d be a Hummer. It’s not going to win any styling awards erring definitely towards function rather than form. Set-up is easy and the adjustable legs mean that the back wheel can be set just off the ground negating the need for a riser block. Unsurprisingly, no matter how much grunt you give it, you’re not going to get any flex or movement and it inspires 100% confidence when performing sprint intervals. The fluid resistance is very smooth, is variable with speed and runs very quietly. The power curve is quite steep and finding the right gearing/speed for easy spinning or recovery takes a bit of trial and error and weaker/smaller riders might find it too much. It’s quite a bit of cash for a trainer without any sort of feedback but, combine it with SRM cranks or a Powertap, and you’d have a complete indoor training system. www.madison.co.uk

    Bombproof, smooth, quiet and effective. Well worth a look if you’re a big powerful rider. 7

    Elite Crono Power Fluid 224.99

    At exactly the same price point as the Blackburn, what the Elite lacks in comparative robustness it more than makes up for in styling and finesse. Following the same car analogy, the Elite is definitely a Ferrari. OK, a turbo doesn’t have to look good but it can’t hurt if it does. Coming pre-assembled and folded, set-up is a breeze and with no resistance adjustment or wires to worry about you can just get on and ride. Stability is good and operation is remarkably quiet and vibration free. Like the Blackburn it uses fluid resistance that gets tougher the faster you go and you can add variety by using your gears. However, the power curve seemed less steep and more progressive than the Blackburn and is much more suited to the average less-powerful rider. Spinning the legs off is far easier and there was more than enough top end resistance for our tester. Another plus point on the Blackburn is that you won’t risk a hernia moving it and it should prove popular as a portable “back of the car” warm-up trainer for testers and crossers. As with the Blackburn, if you’ve already got power measurement technology on your bike buy this and you’ve got a complete training package. www.madison.co.uk

    Simple, smooth, stable and stylish. Just about all you want from a no-frills turbo. 9

    Minoura VFS 150G Fluid Remote 239.99
    First thing out of the box we like the tasty go-faster red colour of the Minoura and getting it ready to go is a blissful allen key free affair. Mounting the bike is easy with the large crank handle and the unique self-setting gravity frame meant no fiddling with hard to reach knobs to get the roller pressure on the tyre correct. Starting to turn the pedals and the large 1.5kg flywheel combined with fluid resistance makes for a smooth and silent riding experience. The gravity frame is a really neat idea but, when we put the power down, it is probably the least stable trainer on test. For most riders doing regular sessions, this wouldn’t be a problem but, if you like to do 100% big gear sprints, this isn’t the trainer for you. Does the addition of a remote resistance lever justify the extra 15 compared to the Blackburn and the Elite? Well, like all the mechanically controlled magnetic resistance models, the actual shift in resistance level is not great across the seven levels and barely noticeable from level to level. Although the Minoura has the least stickiness issues at the top of it’s range, we think this would be a better trainer if the remote was ditched and the price dropped to undercut the Blackburn and Elite.

    Some good innovations and well built, but minor stability issues and a superfluous remote stand against it. 7

    Tacx Flow 384.99
    OK, let’s get the major niggle with the whole Tacx range out of the way first and that’s assembly. They all come flat-packed and require a considerable amount of allen key jiggery-pokery, an extra pair of hands and extreme patience with the less than clear instructions. Fortunately, this was the only one of the three models we had to put together as the rest we tested at the Tacx Test Centre at JE James Cycles Chesterfield www.jejamescycles.co.uk . Once up and running, the Flow is smooth and quiet and the frame felt stable even when out of the saddle climbing/sprinting. The handlebar mounted computer is clear and intuitive to use. The Flow offers full performance feedback including speed, cadence, heart-rate, distance and power. It also allows you to see average figures for the session as you’re riding. For power based training you simply enter in the wattage required and the unit will automatically adjust its resistance to hold you at that figure. It is possible to “fool” it with sudden surges or super slow cadence but within normal training ranges the system is hard to fault. The Flow also allows you to accurately calibrate the unit guaranteeing consistency from session to session. www.fisheroutdoor.co.uk

    Excellent mid-range product that delivers quality workouts, power based training and constant feedback at an affordable price. 9

    Tacx Fortius VR Trainer with Video Reality & VR software 899.99
    If you really struggle to get your head around the idea of indoor cycle training then a virtual reality trainer might be the answer. Once the trainer is built up, the software is surprisingly easy to install and get going. At the mechanical end the motor resistance is super smooth, surprisingly road like in feel and offers up to the equivalent of a 1:4 hill. When “descending” it even kicks in to give a slight freewheeling feel. As you’d expect of a trainer of this price, there’s hardly any noise and the bike feels rock solid in the frame. Onto the software we kicked off racing in the virtual world against computer opposition in a 12 mile race. The racing is fun and there is no doubt it’s a lot more enjoyable than mindlessly staring at the garage wall. From a training perspective you get a good batch of data at the end of a workout including both heart-rate and power stats. Next up was a real time video of riding in Majorca and, once absorbed into the experience, it does feel oddly like riding on the road. It’s possible to buy DVD’s of iconic climbs such as Ventoux and to “ride” them in the comfort of your own home. For an additional 164.99 you can add a steering frame and 239.99 will allow you to race your mates online. www.fisheroutdoor.co.uk

    High quality and fun way to beat indoor training boredom, but it comes at a cost. 8

    Elite Real Axiom CT Internet Ritmo 899.99
    The Real Axiom is Elite’s head to head competition for the Tacx Fortius and, for us, just about edges it. Although it lacks the motor drive and “downhill” feel of the Tacx this isn’t a big loss and the Elastogel roller is smoother and quieter. We found the Ritmo system, that attempts to allow the bike to move more naturally underneath you, a bit gimmicky but it did give a slightly less “anchored to the spot” feel. The Conconi testing and training software is excellent although you should have a bucket nearby if doing the test. The breakdown you get from training sessions is truly mind-boggling and should satisfy the biggest number crunchers. The figures we got compared favourably with lab based results for similar tests. Additionally, there are coaching packages available in the price and e-mail support from the illustrious Conconi lab. Also, you can race online for no additional upgrade, download real rides from GPS and buy classic ride DVD’s. However, and this applies to both of the virtual reality trainers, do you really need one? We can see the appeal if you live in a city or climate where riding outside is impractical most of the time but, unless that’s the case and you’re having to do your longer rides indoors, most indoor sessions will be focussed interval workouts lasting less than an hour and do you need the VR experience for that? www.madison.co.uk

    Excellent smooth and quiet running hardware combined with comprehensive top quality training software. 9

    Cycleops PowerBeam Pro 999.99
    Just under a grand is a lot of money for a trainer that doesn’t offer the virtual reality experience but it’s obvious that a lot of thought has gone into the design of this product. It screams quality and from the moment you go through the blissfully easy set-up to actually turning your pedals you’ve got a contented grin on your face. It’s smooth, quiet and Cycleops have totally nailed the stiffness and stability issues that detracted from earlier incarnations to the point that, with regards to stability, it’s on a par with the beefy Blackburn. Not having wires to worry about or catch your pedals on is a real plus too. Another selling point is that the PowerBeam Pro incorporates PowerTap power measurement technology into a static trainer so your can guarantee accuracy. Using it at its simplest, just punch in the power you want to ride at and the unit constantly adjusts to hold you there. Unlike other cheaper turbos that have a power function the PowerBeam uses a closed feedback loop meaning that the computer and resistance unit are continuously interacting to provide smooth and instantaneous reactions to any changes in effort from you. Combine the PowerBeam with a pc and the included PowerAgent Workout Creator software and you have an extremely powerful, versatile and programmable training tool. www.paligapltd.co.uk

    The eye-watering price tag is all that’s wrong with this trainer. 9

    Conclusion

    The first point to make is that there were no real duds in the test and the overall quality of trainers in terms of build quality, smoothness and quietness has improved right across the price range. As an “emergency” standby or for occasional sessions both the Elite Volare and Tacx Sirius are excellent products but, for the convenience and variety that the remote resistance shifter offers, we’d go for the Tacx. At the top end of the market, the PowerBeam is a great piece of serious kit but the price tag is simply too steep. Of the two virtual reality trainers the Elite Real Axiom just about comes out on top and, if your circumstances make significant amounts of indoor riding a necessity, it’ll make the whole experience far more rewarding and interesting. Both of the rollers on test are high quality products and in a roller test would score very highly. But, in a home trainer test, they’re always going to be marked down for their lack of versatility. Of the mid-range products, the Elite Chrono is a gem and, if you’ve already got power measurement capabilities on your bike, it could be the one to go for. However, if you’re after a serious trainer for some focussed winter work, then the Tacx Flow, offering power based training, full feedback and electronically

  3. #3

    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    Wow - thanks Nikalas - don't think I'll be going down the virtual reality route somehow! but certainly helps me narrow down the many many options. Tacx Sirius looks like a good option for me. Cheers
    Patrick (age 3): Daddy, you're all muddy. Have you been for a run!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Tea & cake's Avatar
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    We have one of the bling Taxc ones. Thought it cost around the 600 mark but that could have been what the OH told me as opposed to what we payed Had it a couple of years now & it is a fantastic bit of kit. Its all linked up to the pc & you can do virtual time trails, races, ride bits of the Tour, Really clever. Impossible to have an easy session tho, as you get constant data on HR, wattage, etc & you always want to beat your virtual competitors

    Silly money but if you can spare the cash it gets a 10/10 from me

  5. #5
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    I've got a cyclops mag; about 60-80 and does the job fine. It's stable, sturdy and easy to adjust.

    If you do get a TT, think seriously about getting a spare rear wheel (any old cheapo thing will do) and cassette. Then you'll be able to run a proper turbo tyre. I've got the Conti turbo tyre, and it's well worth it; much, much quieter than a normal road tyre.
    .

  6. #6
    Master Amex's Avatar
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    Quote Originally Posted by nikalas View Post
    Tested a load recently for a mag article and it really depends what you want and how much you want to spend.

    ... my thoughts below

    Elite Volare Mag Lite 109.99
    A minor faff to set up requiring the use of an additional socket to compliment the supplied allen key. By far the cheapest trainer on test the build quality, although appearing a tad flimsy, is none the less good. Even with our testers 6ft 3” and 13 stone frame it coped admirably with only a minimal amount of flexing. As with all of the Elite trainers, it whirs away with a pleasantly quiet purr and at lower resistance levels feels silky smooth. We couldn’t really see the point of non-remote adjustable resistance and couldn’t imagine clambering on and off mid-workout to adjust it. We reckon, as it did also suffer slightly from magnetic stickiness at the top of the range, you’d simply leave it set on a low-mid resistance and simply use your gears. With this in mind Elite could surely simply ditch the adjustment and produce a gem of a trainer for under 100. Unsurprisingly for such a budget model there is no training feedback. www.madison.co.uk

    Great value and solidly performing budget product that’d suitable for occasional indoor sessions. 7




    Tacx Sirius Soft Gel Folding Mag Trainer 164.99
    Once you’ve spent an afternoon building the thing (see Tacx Flow), the Sirius is a great little turbo. Build quality is excellent, inspiring confidence during harder efforts and not moving or jumping at all. For almost 15 less than the BBB you get a smoother, quieter and better feeling ride. In fact, this is one of the quietest trainers on test. The handlebar mounted remote adjustment unit offers ten levels of resistance and, although from one level to the next, the increase in intensity is barely discernible jumps of two levels give a good progressive feel. Up at the top end of the range there is a bit of stickiness but, out of the magnetic trainers on test, it suffers least from this fault. Combine it with a decent rear wheel mounted computer with cadence monitor for some feedback and you’ll have your winter training sorted for well under 200. www.fisheroutdoor.co.uk

    Does everything you’d want a basic trainer to do very well and it won’t drive your neighbours mad. 8

    BBB Trainer QR 179.95
    Set-up is pretty easy despite “wing-nut I” not actually existing and in fact being an allen key bolt. Once riding it is probably the noisiest of the turbos on test but, to be honest, it’s a pretty marginal thing and this aspect of turbos has improved dramatically across the board in the last couple of years. It does feel stable and there is no sense of flex and wobble even when giving it some real stick. Resistance is altered using a handlebar mounted lever and offers five levels of resistance. However, although there was a noticeable difference between bottom and top, any incremental increase was almost non-existent. Also, at the highest level there is a slight feeling of stickiness that is often a problem with cheaper magnetic resistance systems. There is no training feedback so again a rear mounted computer would be a good idea. www.greyville.com

    Not bad, but there are better trainers available for the money. 5

    Blackburn Tech Fluid 224.99
    The first thing you notice before you even get the Blackburn out of the box is the sheer weight of the thing. This is a genuine heavyweight contender and, before you even get a bike on it, you know this is one seriously well-engineered and bombproof piece of kit. Right down to the chunky crank handle to secure the bike in place, if the Blackburn were a car, it’d be a Hummer. It’s not going to win any styling awards erring definitely towards function rather than form. Set-up is easy and the adjustable legs mean that the back wheel can be set just off the ground negating the need for a riser block. Unsurprisingly, no matter how much grunt you give it, you’re not going to get any flex or movement and it inspires 100% confidence when performing sprint intervals. The fluid resistance is very smooth, is variable with speed and runs very quietly. The power curve is quite steep and finding the right gearing/speed for easy spinning or recovery takes a bit of trial and error and weaker/smaller riders might find it too much. It’s quite a bit of cash for a trainer without any sort of feedback but, combine it with SRM cranks or a Powertap, and you’d have a complete indoor training system. www.madison.co.uk

    Bombproof, smooth, quiet and effective. Well worth a look if you’re a big powerful rider. 7

    Elite Crono Power Fluid 224.99

    At exactly the same price point as the Blackburn, what the Elite lacks in comparative robustness it more than makes up for in styling and finesse. Following the same car analogy, the Elite is definitely a Ferrari. OK, a turbo doesn’t have to look good but it can’t hurt if it does. Coming pre-assembled and folded, set-up is a breeze and with no resistance adjustment or wires to worry about you can just get on and ride. Stability is good and operation is remarkably quiet and vibration free. Like the Blackburn it uses fluid resistance that gets tougher the faster you go and you can add variety by using your gears. However, the power curve seemed less steep and more progressive than the Blackburn and is much more suited to the average less-powerful rider. Spinning the legs off is far easier and there was more than enough top end resistance for our tester. Another plus point on the Blackburn is that you won’t risk a hernia moving it and it should prove popular as a portable “back of the car” warm-up trainer for testers and crossers. As with the Blackburn, if you’ve already got power measurement technology on your bike buy this and you’ve got a complete training package. www.madison.co.uk

    Simple, smooth, stable and stylish. Just about all you want from a no-frills turbo. 9

    Minoura VFS 150G Fluid Remote 239.99
    First thing out of the box we like the tasty go-faster red colour of the Minoura and getting it ready to go is a blissful allen key free affair. Mounting the bike is easy with the large crank handle and the unique self-setting gravity frame meant no fiddling with hard to reach knobs to get the roller pressure on the tyre correct. Starting to turn the pedals and the large 1.5kg flywheel combined with fluid resistance makes for a smooth and silent riding experience. The gravity frame is a really neat idea but, when we put the power down, it is probably the least stable trainer on test. For most riders doing regular sessions, this wouldn’t be a problem but, if you like to do 100% big gear sprints, this isn’t the trainer for you. Does the addition of a remote resistance lever justify the extra 15 compared to the Blackburn and the Elite? Well, like all the mechanically controlled magnetic resistance models, the actual shift in resistance level is not great across the seven levels and barely noticeable from level to level. Although the Minoura has the least stickiness issues at the top of it’s range, we think this would be a better trainer if the remote was ditched and the price dropped to undercut the Blackburn and Elite.

    Some good innovations and well built, but minor stability issues and a superfluous remote stand against it. 7

    Tacx Flow 384.99
    OK, let’s get the major niggle with the whole Tacx range out of the way first and that’s assembly. They all come flat-packed and require a considerable amount of allen key jiggery-pokery, an extra pair of hands and extreme patience with the less than clear instructions. Fortunately, this was the only one of the three models we had to put together as the rest we tested at the Tacx Test Centre at JE James Cycles Chesterfield www.jejamescycles.co.uk . Once up and running, the Flow is smooth and quiet and the frame felt stable even when out of the saddle climbing/sprinting. The handlebar mounted computer is clear and intuitive to use. The Flow offers full performance feedback including speed, cadence, heart-rate, distance and power. It also allows you to see average figures for the session as you’re riding. For power based training you simply enter in the wattage required and the unit will automatically adjust its resistance to hold you at that figure. It is possible to “fool” it with sudden surges or super slow cadence but within normal training ranges the system is hard to fault. The Flow also allows you to accurately calibrate the unit guaranteeing consistency from session to session. www.fisheroutdoor.co.uk

    Excellent mid-range product that delivers quality workouts, power based training and constant feedback at an affordable price. 9

    Tacx Fortius VR Trainer with Video Reality & VR software 899.99
    If you really struggle to get your head around the idea of indoor cycle training then a virtual reality trainer might be the answer. Once the trainer is built up, the software is surprisingly easy to install and get going. At the mechanical end the motor resistance is super smooth, surprisingly road like in feel and offers up to the equivalent of a 1:4 hill. When “descending” it even kicks in to give a slight freewheeling feel. As you’d expect of a trainer of this price, there’s hardly any noise and the bike feels rock solid in the frame. Onto the software we kicked off racing in the virtual world against computer opposition in a 12 mile race. The racing is fun and there is no doubt it’s a lot more enjoyable than mindlessly staring at the garage wall. From a training perspective you get a good batch of data at the end of a workout including both heart-rate and power stats. Next up was a real time video of riding in Majorca and, once absorbed into the experience, it does feel oddly like riding on the road. It’s possible to buy DVD’s of iconic climbs such as Ventoux and to “ride” them in the comfort of your own home. For an additional 164.99 you can add a steering frame and 239.99 will allow you to race your mates online. www.fisheroutdoor.co.uk

    High quality and fun way to beat indoor training boredom, but it comes at a cost. 8

    Elite Real Axiom CT Internet Ritmo 899.99
    The Real Axiom is Elite’s head to head competition for the Tacx Fortius and, for us, just about edges it. Although it lacks the motor drive and “downhill” feel of the Tacx this isn’t a big loss and the Elastogel roller is smoother and quieter. We found the Ritmo system, that attempts to allow the bike to move more naturally underneath you, a bit gimmicky but it did give a slightly less “anchored to the spot” feel. The Conconi testing and training software is excellent although you should have a bucket nearby if doing the test. The breakdown you get from training sessions is truly mind-boggling and should satisfy the biggest number crunchers. The figures we got compared favourably with lab based results for similar tests. Additionally, there are coaching packages available in the price and e-mail support from the illustrious Conconi lab. Also, you can race online for no additional upgrade, download real rides from GPS and buy classic ride DVD’s. However, and this applies to both of the virtual reality trainers, do you really need one? We can see the appeal if you live in a city or climate where riding outside is impractical most of the time but, unless that’s the case and you’re having to do your longer rides indoors, most indoor sessions will be focussed interval workouts lasting less than an hour and do you need the VR experience for that? www.madison.co.uk

    Excellent smooth and quiet running hardware combined with comprehensive top quality training software. 9

    Cycleops PowerBeam Pro 999.99
    Just under a grand is a lot of money for a trainer that doesn’t offer the virtual reality experience but it’s obvious that a lot of thought has gone into the design of this product. It screams quality and from the moment you go through the blissfully easy set-up to actually turning your pedals you’ve got a contented grin on your face. It’s smooth, quiet and Cycleops have totally nailed the stiffness and stability issues that detracted from earlier incarnations to the point that, with regards to stability, it’s on a par with the beefy Blackburn. Not having wires to worry about or catch your pedals on is a real plus too. Another selling point is that the PowerBeam Pro incorporates PowerTap power measurement technology into a static trainer so your can guarantee accuracy. Using it at its simplest, just punch in the power you want to ride at and the unit constantly adjusts to hold you there. Unlike other cheaper turbos that have a power function the PowerBeam uses a closed feedback loop meaning that the computer and resistance unit are continuously interacting to provide smooth and instantaneous reactions to any changes in effort from you. Combine the PowerBeam with a pc and the included PowerAgent Workout Creator software and you have an extremely powerful, versatile and programmable training tool. www.paligapltd.co.uk

    The eye-watering price tag is all that’s wrong with this trainer. 9

    Conclusion

    The first point to make is that there were no real duds in the test and the overall quality of trainers in terms of build quality, smoothness and quietness has improved right across the price range. As an “emergency” standby or for occasional sessions both the Elite Volare and Tacx Sirius are excellent products but, for the convenience and variety that the remote resistance shifter offers, we’d go for the Tacx. At the top end of the market, the PowerBeam is a great piece of serious kit but the price tag is simply too steep. Of the two virtual reality trainers the Elite Real Axiom just about comes out on top and, if your circumstances make significant amounts of indoor riding a necessity, it’ll make the whole experience far more rewarding and interesting. Both of the rollers on test are high quality products and in a roller test would score very highly. But, in a home trainer test, they’re always going to be marked down for their lack of versatility. Of the mid-range products, the Elite Chrono is a gem and, if you’ve already got power measurement capabilities on your bike, it could be the one to go for. However, if you’re after a serious trainer for some focussed winter work, then the Tacx Flow, offering power based training, full feedback and electronically
    In the Market for buying one of these,
    any more info as its a year or so old?
    Thanks
    Going to try again....

  7. #7
    Master Stagger's Avatar
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    Quote Originally Posted by Amex View Post
    In the Market for buying one of these,
    any more info as its a year or so old?
    Thanks
    I bought one off eBay Steve, 30 and it does the job. In my limited opinion the most important thing is a fan to blow on you while you pedal other wise you will just turn to water.

    All the best Big Fella:thumbup:
    A quote,

    "The greatest accomplishment is not in never falling, but in rising again after you fall."

  8. #8
    Grandmaster dominion's Avatar
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    I'll do you one of these for 50 plus postage at cost. Trouble is they're bloody heavy!

    http://www.discountbicycles.co.uk/bi...php?xProd=2356

  9. #9
    Master Amex's Avatar
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    Quote Originally Posted by dominion View Post
    I'll do you one of these for 50 plus postage at cost. Trouble is they're bloody heavy!

    http://www.discountbicycles.co.uk/bi...php?xProd=2356
    are you sure ?? would be great if you could where abouts in the country
    Going to try again....

  10. #10
    Grandmaster dominion's Avatar
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    Re: What Turbo Trainer

    Quote Originally Posted by Amex View Post
    are you sure ?? would be great if you could where abouts in the country
    Home is Burton upon Trent, work is in Nottingham. I'll weigh it tonight and see how much it will cost to ship it. I bought one of those iMagic thingamys last year so it's lying redundant.

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